Translation of shack in Spanish:

shack

choza, n.

Pronunciation: /ʃæk//ʃak/

noun

  • 1

    choza feminine
    casucha feminine
    rancho masculine Latin America
    jacal masculine Mexico
    bohío masculine Central America Colombia
    • But neither they nor he wanted to stray too far from the collection of small-scale bungalows, shacks, and cabins that make up this mountain town's built context.
    • In Cairo, Egypt, the rooftops of countless buildings are crowded with makeshift tents, shacks and mud shelters.
    • I saw it all around - the shacks, hovels, families collecting cow dung in the fields or breaking rocks for a new road.
    • Others were shacks, inns, or just rows of shops.
    • Running around the sides of the shack is a roughly constructed porch, which can be reached via two short stairways.
    • From among a cluster of shacks and lean-to's and concrete outhouses, clinging to the central building like barnacles on an oyster, you could see the outlines of what had once been a magnificent palace.
    • As the shacks turned to makeshift apartment buildings, the drug of choice shifted from marijuana to cocaine, and the weapons that the teenage boys carried soon became automatic rifles.
    • Beyond, above the corrugated iron roofs of the rum shacks, towered the great twin peaks of St. Lucia's two tropical Matterhorns, the pitons.
    • In tents, shacks, log cabins and frame dwellings, pioneers gathered together for protection.
    • It stood out like the Taj Mahal in a trailer camp as it was surrounded by what can only be described as windowless hovels and wooden shacks.
    • They were replaced by shanties and shacks built of nothing more than clapboard or wattle and daub with dark and threatening alleyways between.
    • The buildings soon turned from downtown shamble shacks to upscale skyscrapers, apartments, and business buildings.
    • A few hundred yards up the beach ran a small line of shops and food shacks, and the tourists made for them.
    • From numerous visits to the city and perhaps even periods of short-term residence or work, islanders know that many Tahitian families struggle to make a living and reside in squalid shacks.
    • And if they weren't houses then they were apartment buildings, or department stores, or supermarkets, or malls, or office buildings, or warehouses, or shacks, or kiosks, or maybe even tents.
    • It was more of a shack than a house, but still, a living accommodation.
    • By the late 1880s many Ojibwa lived in one-room log cabins, frame cabins, or tar paper shacks rather than in wigwams.
    • Even without seeing or experiencing the carnage first hand, its spirit floods the freeways and works its wounded presence into the pots and pans of the shacks and palaces nearby.
    • Scattered across the dirt are the Vulture Mine's remnants: rusted equipment, tumbledown shacks, bunkhouses, corked whiskey bottles, and cracked furniture.
    • Where the status of a shack or a hut is concerned our concept of ‘house’ may simply fail to provide for a definite decision.