There are 2 main translations of shanty in Spanish

: shanty1shanty2

shanty1

casucha, n.

Pronunciation: /ˈʃanti//ˈʃæn(t)i/

noun

  • 1

    (hut)
    casucha feminine
    rancho masculine Latin America
    chabola feminine Spain

There are 2 main translations of shanty in Spanish

: shanty1shanty2

shanty2

canción de marineros, n.

Pronunciation: /ˈʃanti//ˈʃæn(t)i/

noun

  • 1British

    canción de marineros feminine
    • Sing me a sea chanty and I'll consider letting you eat me food.
    • As the album winds its way down, his role comes to the fore, the gentleness setting the lullabies and chanteys in a peaceful sea for ‘Canopy of Heaven’ and ‘A Fire Under the Stars’.
    • Songs and shanties were put to the tunes being played, and hoots and cheers of laughter followed the dancing as the sun began to set and the party began.
    • The musical form and melodic characteristics suggest the Anglo-Celtic and African influences of the multinational workforce that sang the shanty.
    • He'd get some old sailor to sing an old sea shanty with a cracked voice.
    • The sound of pipes joined the beat of the drum, and the men began to sing a hearty Canaanite sea shanty as the ship moved through the surf and out to sea.
    • Sea chanteys (sailors' songs) have been sung throughout the sea-faring Omanis' history.
    • I stood at that wheel with confidence; my crew was singing shanties as they always did.
    • It's a fascinating remnant of a little-known corner of history - a shanty sung by black ocean-going sailors, lamenting their unequal pay.
    • In addition, sea songs and shanties will be supported by a vast array of maritime-themed events and activities.
    • The best moment of this set is the interlude between Scenes 2 and 3 in Act One, with the sound of moonlight on the water, the gentle heaving of the terrifying sea, and sailors below-decks keeping their courage up singing by sea chanteys.
    • A recent recruit from Liverpool who joined his Stafford Street office was welcomed with a few jaunty choruses from a sea shanty.
    • At Copley, he also exhibited a continuous 80 slide projection, coupled with an audiotape, showing a nine-person chorus singing sea chanteys with a pianist accompanying them.
    • Caught off guard, Olive stared open mouthed at the newcomer as he kept singing his sea shanty in a rich baritone voice, oblivious to his audience.
    • As Ohearn and Devlin started singing an old sea shanty, the others joined in with their voices and began to jostle one another for the wine.
    • Sometimes when we were mopping the deck, an activity in which Catherine and Nicholas were exempted from, the two would dance around singing the sea chantey that Patch, the singer of the group, had taught us a few days before.
    • Similarly, Darcy's music privileges a quaintly macabre sensibility; there's an echo of Appalachian murder ballads and maudlin clipper-ship shanties.
    • It spins to the music of Christine, music tormentingly cheerful like some mad maiden's shanty for a sailor gone away to sea.
    • She watched the nimble sailors go about their business, singing shanties and being useful and she longed to join them.
    • In Helen Mirra's video The Ballad of Myra Furrow, the artist, dressed in a peacoat and cap, sings a sea chantey as she stands before Lake Michigan in the drizzling rain.
    • His house is roofless and a small shanty next to it serves as a shelter.
    • The sight took me back 25 years, to my university town, watching African women walking down from the hills, through the centre where our university residences were, on their way to their shanties on the outskirts.
    • Squatters' shanties can be found on the fringes of the cities.
    • They set up their humble shanties at the confluence of the Lumpur and Klang rivers (In fact, Kuala Lumpur means a ‘muddy confluence’ in Malay).
    • As growth continued, substantial brick and stone buildings replaced frontier tents and shanties.
    • However, immigrant workers from other African countries often live in shanties that ring these and other cities.
    • As Noel kept up a commentary on his life in the aborigine reservations, he also showed pictures of how tin shanties and flimsy tents were the ‘homes’ of the aborigines for the better part of the 20th century.
    • Moreover, for at least thirty years, Portland had two Chinatowns, one an urban community of brick structures and the other one a vegetable-gardening community of wooden huts and shanties.
    • Cite Soleil, the capital's front door, is a 27 sq mile slum where an estimated one million people live in shanties lacking plumbing, electricity or permanent roofs.
    • There are drooping shanties, skinny dogs and an old man bent over his plants.
    • Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small-arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members.
    • A variety of shanties and shelters can be attached to these houses as households engage in petty commerce and services.
    • They were replaced by shanties and shacks built of nothing more than clapboard or wattle and daub with dark and threatening alleyways between.
    • Now those people live close to his village in shanties.
    • In Casablanca, the other half lives in areas like Sidi Moumen, a sprawling residential zone that is mostly shanties, home to 200,000.
    • It was all right for you to live in shanties and not to have any voice in what's going on, but now you have.
    • Following an extension of deadline and several warnings, the state, on June 14, razed hundreds of shanties in the beach area.
    • This group of people living in subterranean shanties are proof that, as one of them says in the film, ‘homeless doesn't mean helpless.’
    • Ordinarily lame and mundane places like rotary clubs transform into shanties of shock and mazes of monstrosity.
    • The poorest peasants and urban dwellers build their own adobe huts or wooden shanties.