Translation of shout in Spanish:

shout

grito, n.

Pronunciation /ʃaʊt//ʃaʊt/

noun

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    grito masculine
    to give a shout of joy/pain dar un grito de alegría/dolor
    • Then, there was a loud shout and all hell broke loose.
    • She heard a loud shout coming from the top floor.
    • Just then, an excited shout shifted Brenna's attention.
    • The shouts grew louder and louder as the guards approached.
    • His shout attracted Paris' attention, and he looked over Helen's shoulder at his brother.
    • Then loud shouts and insults were heard in the house.
    • They go off with a very intense flash and a loud shout.
    • Loud shouts, yells, and laughs ran from the tavern and out onto the street, disturbing the town's late night silence.
    • A shout caught my attention and I heard the soldiers switch their direction.
    • There were dozens of torches on the walls, and there were loud shouts and screams from all around him.
    • A second later, there were loud shouts from the beach.
    • Meanwhile, the scream cuts off, and is replaced by loud shouts and noisy swearing in Spanish.
    • A shout drew my attention to one of the others - only a hand was sticking out through the snow.
    • A shout captured everyone's attention, and they scurried down from the rocks to the trickle of water.
    • Each punch that hit her was followed by a loud shout.
    • The superior officer clapped his hands and called for attention with a loud shout, which echoed throughout the hold.
    • She gave out a strong shout, much louder than she intended to.
    • He woke them up with a shout for attention that made the amplifiers screech and whine.
    • I heard another cheer go up, and heard loud whoops and shouts.
    • They were right behind her, their shouts becoming louder.

intransitive verb

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    gritar
    there's no need to shout no hace falta que grites
    • don't all shout out at once no griten todos a la vez
    • to shout at sb gritarle a algn
    • don't shout at me ¡no me grites!
    • to shout to sb gritarle a algn
    • he shouted to her to come back le gritó que volviese
    • to shout for sb llamar a algn a gritos
    • to shout for sth pedir algo a gritos
    • to shout for help pedir auxilio a gritos
    • to shout for joy gritar de alegría
    • They should shout louder and louder until people listen.
    • Sarah shouted as loud as she could so that she could be heard over the other members of the welcoming party for the boat.
    • The two kids shouted out loud as they hugged the woman at the door.
    • But if you do shout loud enough, you will get what you want and need.
    • Her father shouted, loud enough to make Melanie shudder and step back.
    • Dishes clang, waiters shout, children laugh and people chatter away in expressive, nine-tone, high volume Cantonese.
    • Once, after a Chopin recital, he began shouting out loud in the street.
    • There were perhaps two points when he resorted to yelling, but he was shouting over a loud ovation in the auditorium.
    • But I can't help notice Elias Soriano's strong vocals when he's not shouting or being drowned out by the bass.
    • She heard a loud neigh and people shouting outside.
    • I didn't shout or scream because I thought they would push me off.
    • The soldiers were shouting and whooping and hollering.
    • Delighted family members and neighbours shouted with joy and clapped loudly.
    • While he's focusing, the Emerson kids keep shouting and screaming and waving beer bottles in the air.
    • Simply because she can shout louder than Kelvin Ramnath does not mean that she makes sense.
    • Ben shouted as loud as he could and waved his arms above his head.
    • She had shouted so loud in his face that Troy jumped startled and lost his grip on the beaker.
    • She was shouting so loud that her mom peered in through the door.
    • They were shouting and roaring and had obviously consumed a lot of alcohol or maybe something stronger.
    • Michael shouted with some enthusiastic joy that seemed to come out of nowhere.

transitive verb

  • 1

    gritar
    go away! he shouted —¡váyanse!— gritó
    • I shouted (out) a warning les (or le etc.) grité advirtiéndoles (or advirtiéndole etc.)
    • to shout abuse at sb insultar a algn a gritos
    • When Celia asked if she could take their photo, Floyd shouted out, ‘As long as it's not for the FBI!’
    • He shouted out ‘Kieran, Kieran’ but there was no answer.
    • He thought they might have had a gun so he shouted out that he had a gun in the room and the men ran off.
    • A female friend Ms Owen shouted out in court that the decision to adjourn the hearing was ‘cruel.’
    • Someone shouted out that they could see thick smoke in the distance.
    • A member of the public shouted out ‘You're completely ignorant.’
    • Allegedly she turns when her name is shouted out.
    • All of a sudden there was a lady who shouted out to her husband ‘Well if you're not going to pay attention to me these guys back here will.’
    • Ross Hibbert is quite right that it was Billy Cotton, not Arthur Askey, who shouted out ‘Wakey Wakey!’
    • They shouted out answers, and interrupted the teacher and other students.
    • Yet he was unbothered by it and quickly shouted out, ‘I saved the glasses!’
    • Naturally, most will want to witness this spectacle with an audience, so as not to miss the rice, toilet paper and lines being shouted out by various enthusiasts.
    • He shouted out that he needed assistance, as he said, ‘I've been shot.’
    • The woman teaching the class has never had a baby, and she openly scolded me and Jon when we shouted out, ‘Cigars!’
    • And now a name was shouted out from the audience!
    • As the girl and her friend ran off, he shouted out that she was beautiful.
    • After one of his typically brilliant campaign speeches, someone shouted out to Stevenson from the crowd that he had the votes of all thinking Americans.
    • Two ran away, and one shouted out that her boyfriend would be along shortly.
    • I shouted out ‘House’ and all my friends started to scream.
    • Stuart shouted out that he used to be a plumber, rolled up his sleeves, got down on the floor and fiddled about in the cistern until it was fixed.