Translation of Sioux in Spanish:

Sioux

siux, n.

Pronunciation: /su//suː/

noun

  • 1

    (masculine and feminine) siux
    (masculine and feminine) sioux
    • Early in the battle, the advancing Sioux stampeded their horses.
    • North Dakota's mascot, by the way, is the fighting Sioux.
    • The Santee's culture was not only disrupted, the Sioux gradually found themselves dependent on trade goods, which made them easy prey for the white merchants.
    • Although suffering from hunger because of a prolonged drought and government cutbacks in their rations, the Sioux were not taking up arms.
    • The forest Sioux of northern Minnesota were already on the retreat before the first white men came in 1660.
    • This mine, which has been in nearly continual operation since the Sioux were driven out of the mountains, has generated more than a billion dollars in revenue.
    • The Sioux ruled an enormous grassland empire, from Canada to Missouri, from Minnesota to Montana.
    • Custer reasoned that dragging the guns and ammunition over mountain trails would have decreased his speed and ruined his chances of finding the elusive Sioux.
    • Back at the village, O'Meara comes to the realization that he is not really a Sioux.
    • The Wasase is a ceremony that we adopted from the Sioux more than 200 years ago.
    • Certain kinds of actions by the tribal council, however, are subject to the authority of the secretary of the interior of the U.S. government, a reminder that the Sioux are not alone in their land.
    • The Crows sprang to the attack, swarming over the embattled Sioux who had no time to reload their weapons.
    • Before long the Sioux, who can't speak English, let alone French, finds himself fighting for survival on the streets of Marseille.
    • The Sioux understandably resented the invasion of their territory, and the United States Army made largely ineffectual efforts to deter the horde of gold seekers.
    • I don't know if Congress included representatives of the Sioux in their deliberations when the legislation was discussed.
    • His family settled there in the 1880s about a decade after the Sioux beat Custer.
    • As Wakefield learned firsthand, the Sioux's patience was not without limits.
    • The Sioux must now get permission from the National Park Service to go onto their own sacred land, officially known as Devils Tower National Monument.
    • Who shall blame the Sioux for defending themselves, their wives and children, when attacked in their own encampment and threatened with destruction?
    • Friendly Sioux camped nearby hailed the boat as it landed and took hold of the docking ropes, demanding that the vessel's captain treat them to presents.