Translation of sneak in Spanish:

sneak

Pronunciation /snik//sniːk/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (smuggle)
    he sneaked it through customs lo pasó de contrabando (por la aduana)
    • I sneaked the bottle into the room under my coat entré en la sala con la botella escondida bajo el abrigo
    • he sneaked the files out of the office sacó los archivos de la oficina a escondidas / a hurtadillas
    • she was caught trying to sneak him in without paying la pillaron tratando de colarlo sin pagar
    • I'm glad I snuck him some steak juice off the plate tonight.
    • I later learned that if he had kept quiet about having the puppy, my dad could have snuck her onto the plane with him.
    • He got the backing of a church and they sneaked him out of the country, disguised as a priest.
    • I would just pay someone to sneak me across the Mexican border.
    • My parents use to sneak me into jazz clubs when I was underage
    • So, you know, to sneak someone onto a cruise ship, that would be almost an impossibility.
    • She had forced me on a veggie diet, but every night, Robert snuck me some real food.
    • However, the little fool went and evaded us all and snuck you away to his old home.
    • Mom would sneak me into all sorts of contests for kids like me.
    • But the good bit was, my uncle and aunty were there, and they snuck us into the VIP area.
    • I sneaked her across to the west wing of the mansion, and up the flight of stairs.
    • If this significant other is not from said hostel then sneaking her in is quite a problem.
    • If you're riding a hold-up horse or a doubtful stayer you have to sneak him round, taking the shortest route around the inside and keeping him as relaxed and switched-off as possible.
    • I snuck him some of my food, and he thanked me, but he only ate it to please me I think.
    • Anna sneaks us onto the tube with her pass, something I would never do when sober.
    • I'm not entirely sure how we ended up back in my room, how I snuck him there, but we did, and no one else was in there.
    • The nurse sneaked me biscuits which are still in my bag.
    • I hoped that lofty ambition alone might sneak me through to the finals.
    • I agreed and we snuck him down the hallway and into his room.
    • My parents had to hide me for 3 years before they snuck me out of the country.
  • 2

    (take furtively)
    we caught him sneaking a drink lo pillamos bebiendo a escondidas
    • to sneak a look at sth/sb mirar algo/a algn con disimulo / subrepticiamente

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (go furtively)
    to sneak in/out entrar/salir a hurtadillas
    • to sneak away escabullirse
    • he managed to sneak past the guard logró pasar sin que el guardia se diera cuenta
    • If he could sneak past anyone lingering in the hallway, he'd be in the clear to read any file he liked.
    • Similarly, fortifying border patrols to thwart anyone from sneaking in won't do much.
    • All the missions you're sent on involve sneaking around, stealing, kidnapping and killing without being detected.
    • A few stragglers return from lunch, and the April afternoon clouds are too threatening to tempt anyone to sneak out for an early tee time.
    • They snuck stealthily down the street until they came to a store.
    • At least they managed to sneak in actual ballet moves and some of Tchaikovsky's music, so it isn't a total loss.
    • They also had searchlights encase anyone tried to sneak out during the night.
    • I couldn't think of why anyone would be sneaking around; I was already pretty much helpless as far as they were concerned.
    • She doesn't have to sneak out, beat anyone up, or anything like that.
    • One extreme is to take your time to plan, be stealthy and sneak around in the dark to avoid all confrontation.
    • Anyone trying to sneak out a few minutes early will be hard pressed to leave before the ‘real’ ending.
    • But it's also just as much about sneaking, stealth, hiding, and disguising.
    • But if you are a chameleon, you can sneak in and move ahead with the furtiveness required in one-day cricket.
    • As her group moved forward, she snuck behind a building and waited for the footsteps of her group to fade away.
    • In the run-up to the finals, police at airports, rail stations and ports will be on the look-out for anyone trying to sneak to Portugal.
    • They stealthily sneak back onto the path, not talking as they walk to the town.
    • She sneaks upstairs and moves through the hall way to her room.
    • He flattened underneath window and used his stealth power to sneak around to the back.
    • She grinned as she began sneaking stealthily up on a boy her age sitting on the picnic table under the large oak tree the school was built around.
    • Somehow, they managed to sneak in without anyone noticing them.
  • 2British informal

    (tell tales)
    acusar
    ir con cuentos informal
    chivarse Spain informal
    to sneak on sb acusar a algn
    • As I passed the house a third and final time, I managed to sneak a peek through the gap in the trees.
    • Maybe I could sneak them the key, but how would I obtain it?
    • I sneaked a look at her and saw the utter disappointment in her face.
    • As we ate, I sneaked one or two discreet glances at him.
    • She noticed me looking from the other side of the bar, smiled shyly and blushed, before sneaking another glance my way as she turned her back.
    • She continued to read silently, her eyes glancing upwards to sneak a peek at Zach.
    • Then it continued to be somewhat smoke free as she snuck cigarettes outside or in the garage.
    • He resumed his eye-search of the room, and snuck a glance back at the short blonde girl he'd noticed earlier.
    • All he could see was this fake white beard and tell from certain furtive movements that Grampa was trying to sneak a peek at him without being noticed.
    • This is a conservative measure because it assumes the nesting male does not obtain any fitness from sneaked spawns.
    • Raymond glanced up from his plate, sneaking a peek at Amy before moving his eyes towards Lana.
    • That means they won't be able to sneak wins with a single goal.
    • Another intense rally opens the third game of the set and the American just sneaks the point.
    • My legs have become fidgety and my glance goes against my own will as it sneaks its way in his direction.
    • What seems to have happened then is that someone sneaked to the authorities.
    • If we got the penalty or a goal somewhere we might have sneaked a draw, and if we had got our backsides out of it we would have learned so much again and it would have been great but it wasn't to be.
    • He stands there nodding to every word Mrs. Miller says while sneaking glances around the office, searching for someone to take his place.
    • Her voice died out and she snuck a glance back toward the wanderer, his eyes were still on the road ahead showing no expressions.
    • From this new position, he sneaks covert glances across the aisle at her soft profile.
    • He put an arm around Ashley and led her away, sneaking a glance back at the pillar to make sure that Britney got away without being seen.
    • I glanced at the nervous looking boy who kept on sneaking glanced towards Marah.

noun

British
informal

  • 1

    soplón masculine informal
    soplona feminine informal
    acusete feminine informal
    acusón masculine Latin America informal
    acusona feminine Latin America informal
    chivato masculine Spain informal
    chivata feminine Spain informal
    • Now he was a great big, ugly, bucktoothed guy, a real creepola, with sneaky eyes and, you guessed it, a well-earned reputation for being a sneak.
    • Biographers were ever the under-belly of the literary world, patronised because they weren't epic poets or triple-decker novelists, and demonised as gossips and sneaks.
    • The sneak from behind the bicycle shed is preparing his most squalid betrayal of Britain yet.

adjective

  • 1

    (visit/attack) (invariable adjective) sorpresa