Translation of snob in Spanish:

snob

(e)snob, n.

Pronunciation: /snɒb//snɑb/

noun

  • 1

    (masculine and feminine) (e)snob
    she's a music/wine snob se las da de entendida en música/vinos
    • But I'd argue that among rock snobs of all ages, quiet is the new loud.
    • These kiddies are young and you won't be finding too much to appeal to the music snobs, but that there's some potential.
    • The range of drinks available, and the local approach to them, makes Italy the most sophisticated drinking culture in Europe, and there are hardly any wine snobs.
    • Like geeky music snobs sneering as their favourite indie band climbs the charts, they view success as a sign of impurity, popularity as poison.
    • They plug into portable devices and laptops, and will impress even insufferable music snobs.
    • There have always been classical and opera snobs who look down on the inferior world of pop and rock.
    • But food snobs have some more tricks up their sleeves.
    • Now the travel snob is not a new phenomenon, he has been around for years.
    • Broadsheet snobs can dismiss me all they like, but I'm selling papers and they're not.
    • What is it with music snobs only being able to appreciate good throwaway pop ten years later?
    • When the people who get ‘celebrated’ are chefs, models, celebrity real estate agents and wine snobs, we're in trouble.
    • I'm going to write about comic book snobs later.
    • A common complaint issued by food snobs is that supermarket fruit and veggies is all standardised - the stores won't stock lopsided peppers or mean-looking garlic, and it is all a bit chilled and insipid.
    • How many food snobs would still be raving about white truffles if they were ubiquitous?
    • In short, I really became quite the superior rock snob.
    • There is obvious pleasure in exposing wine snobs, even more than Literature snobs.
    • Unfortunately you've had it: you are in the company of a travel snob.