Translation of solo in Spanish:

solo

solo, n.

Pronunciation /ˈsoʊloʊ//ˈsəʊləʊ/

noun

  • 1

    solo masculine
    a solo for piano un solo para piano
    • a violin solo un solo de violín
    • a piano solo un solo de piano
    • to perform a solo ejecutar un solo
    • Arpino's great choreographic imagination was at work throughout the suite of dances - solos, pas de deux, pas de trois, etc.
    • Lifar's retelling of the Icarus myth is essentially a solo danced against the choral movement of a group.
    • Rasta Thomas integrated himself beautifully into the ensemble and danced two respectable solos.
    • Then there is the weird idea of having the entire corps lightly but sappily wave their hands in time to the music when anyone dances a solo.
    • He published accordion music and French instrumental solos.
    • Then followed skit, vocal solo, instrumental solo, group dance and group music competitions.
    • The choreography demands very strong technique, much coordination, solos, duet dances.
    • This also affects the soli which all require an absolutely clean portamento and a beautifully crafted rubato.
    • The jazz inflected vocal and instrumental solos could have been written by Weill.
    • American Ballet Theatre principal Susan Jaffe set the tone for an evening of extraordinary dance with her opening solo as the Dying Swan.
    • The ex-punk, classically outlandish Clark gave Trevitt a superb solo to music of Erik Satie, titled Satie Stud.
    • She was working in a chorus line and also doing an eccentric solo - a fan dance on pointe.
    • During the 96th festival there have been classes for choirs, vocal solos, duets, groups, strings, woodwind, brass and keyboard players.
    • Boasting more than 12,000 total titles, the Willis catalog also includes everything from band and orchestra music and guitar solos, to operettas and manuscript paper.
    • The festival includes classes for choirs, vocal solos, duets, groups, pianoforte, strings, woodwind, guitar ensembles, composition, brass and keyboards.
    • A variety of musical talent will be performing, including rising star James Loynes, with guests performing Lloyd Webber, piano solos and popular music.
    • We had many elaborate presentations - clarinet concertos, violin solos, flute duets and saxophone trios.
    • His sectional verse anthems incorporate solos, duets, trios, and passages for organ alone.
    • The three-hour service - without flowers, rings, solos, or instrumental music - is similar to an Amish worship service.
    • The Song Book solos are little musical epigrams, which happen to survey popular Twenties piano styles from an often-ironic distance.
  • 2also solo whist

    (en el que cada uno de los cuatro jugadores se enfrenta a los otros tres) whist masculine
    • Solo whist is a plain-trick game with trumps and bidding, closely related to the more elaborate and now obsolete game of Boston.

adjective

  • 1

    Music
    (violin/voices) solista
    (album) en solitario
    (piece) para voz solista
    (piece) para instrumento solista
    to go solo lanzarse como solista
    • In 1996, Nyolo released a successful solo acoustic album Tribu, followed by Multiculti later on.
    • There is a bitter-sweet edge to Liam Browne's preparations for his first-ever solo art exhibition.
    • Wermuth was the first artist to produce a solo textile exhibition in Bulgaria in 1963.
    • Imagine what would have happened to an album of double-digit minute solo piano improvisations in the hands of one with lesser talent.
    • The solo acoustic worked wonders for him, as he seemed to enjoy doing magic tricks on his guitar.
    • He'll pilot the sub solo - to depths where humans aren't meant to go.
    • Is the work as satisfying as your more personal, solo artistic projects?
    • Several unhappy attempts at solo careers later, the hatchet has finally been buried, for a second album.
    • Her first solo public exhibition, in 1965, was at a theatre in Prague, and after that she began to be included in exhibitions of ‘naive’ artists.
    • When the rest of the boys discovered a solo piano version from 1967, they simply layered it over the original backing track and added choirs of eerily reverbed vocals.
    • If some of those churches embrace a policy of isolation then they should do it solo and not try to recruit others to follow suit.
    • He had become the youngest person to complete a solo transatlantic crossing at 12.50 GMT on Sunday when he was still 15.
    • Ray went solo some years back and has carved out his own niche in the market playing shows in many parts of the country.
    • And last week he added to his wacky resume by becoming the first man to fly an aircraft solo around the world without stopping or refueling.
    • When you finally reached the level of flying the plane solo, the satisfaction was incredible.
    • He's promoting his new solo acoustic album Going Somewhere, but he will also play a few old favourites.
    • When I'm solo I have more time with each sound, I can get a lot more out of each sound.
    • When she went solo she changed her name to Deborah, but found the fans only wanted Blondie.
    • Is it time for a solo female anchor of one of these newscasts?
    • His latest solo piano album was nominated for five Grammy Awards, and the festival will feature some of the work for which he is best known.
  • 2

    Aviation
    (flight/attempt) en solitario

adverb

  • 1

    en solitario
    to fly solo volar en solitario