There are 2 main translations of steep in Spanish

: steep1steep2

steep1

empinado, adj.

Pronunciation /stip//stiːp/

adjective

  • 1

    • 1.1

      (hill/slope/stairs) empinado
      (drop) brusco
      (drop) abrupto
      (descent) en picada
      (descent) en picado Spain
      • He was a dedicated hill climber, though, and on every steep slope was at or near the front.
      • Many follow the island's 1,365 miles of irrigation channels, called levadas, stretches of which run along steep slopes with precipitous drops to one side.
      • After another gate, continue to a stream before climbing north-eastwards up the steep slopes of Compass Hill, whose iron content plays havoc with the compass.
      • The whole stretch of these steep slopes were once upon a time known as the ‘ravine of the monkeys’ because only monkeys could climb these ravines with ease.
      • Bearded passages of vegetation cling to steep rock, and the strong Yangtze current spills diagonally along the bottom of the frame.
      • Bungling bureaucrats even failed to inform people that there was a problem with the stairlift and that the only way to get to the first floor centre was up a steep flight of stairs.
      • Franz could see that they were heading west, up into the steep slopes of the Continental Divide, angling towards Berthoud Pass.
      • Proposed changes include moving the box office, which is currently at the top of a steep flight of stairs, to the ground floor.
      • At Gusev Crater, Spirit had to divert from her original course up Husband Hill because the slopes were too steep and the sandy terrain too slippery.
      • We pass along dark, narrow corridors and up and down innumerable flights of steep stairs.
      • The Danish Kitchen in High Ousegate has no disabled toilets at all, and the ordinary toilets are up an impossibly steep flight of stairs.
      • There the vast plain narrowed to just under five kilometers wide, protected on the south by the steep slope of Mount Gilboa and by the hills of Galilee on the north.
      • The lavatory is on the same level as the rest of the box - at the top of two long, steep flights of stairs.
      • From here tackle the eroded path which climbs the steep slopes just east of Ben Vrackie's SW crags.
      • Getting on to the platforms is a huge problem for him as he is faced with steep flights of stairs he must climb before reaching the platforms.
      • They come in out of relatively deep water on to steep beaches, rather than break, surge up the beach.
      • From her angle, it appeared to be a steep slope of some kind.
      • The buss rolled on, up hills, down steep slopes, then up a few more hills.
      • She had to hit the ball at just the right angle off the side to make it roll up a steep slope around a curve.
      • Leave the path about a mile after Lone and climb steep slopes interspersed with bands of rock.

    • 1.2(large)

      (decline/increase) considerable
      (increase/decline) pronunciado
      (decline/increase) marcado
      • How these results square with the steep rise in the incidence of depression over recent years, Time did not explain.
      • Police say advanced technology in mobile phones is behind a steep rise in vehicle crime in south Manchester.
      • The teaching crisis and steep rise in policing costs alone make further big increases look inevitable.
      • There are warnings that council tax could rise or services be cut to pay for the steep rise in bills to heat and provide power to offices, schools, homes for the elderly and leisure centres.
      • Not only is there going to be a steady and steep rise in the numbers needing long-term care, but there is a falling number of those of working age paying the tax to provide it.
      • ‘We are seeing quite a steep rise among young people,’ he said.
      • One of the immediate results of the attacks on America was a steep rise in the purchase of books about Islam and the Middle East.
      • It was a very steep rise from March through to the end of May.
      • But fears were growing that many householders would face steep rises in bills as a result.
      • Other independent traders who are facing steep rises include Tony Nixon, owner of a second-hand car dealership in Bournemouth, Dorset.
      • Despite steep rises in crime after the 1960s similar to Britain, countries such as America, France and Germany have all been more effective at tackling it.
      • There was a steep rise in the number of wandering lunatics following the Erwadi tragedy.
      • Big corporations, meanwhile, will get hit especially hard by the steep rise in property taxes.
      • The steep rise in thefts is also damaging the Government's record on crime.
      • The Met can't seem to make its mind up over whether there has been ‘no fluctuation’ in knife crime in the past three years, or a steep rise.
      • These associations started in Europe and the United States some 30 years ago at a time of rapid expansion in the road traffic industry and a steep rise in road traffic injuries.
      • However, this increase must be placed in the context of a steep rise in the cost to the Exchequer of disease eradication measures in recent years.
      • Parents are being urged to make sure their children receive their MMR vaccine after a steep rise in the number of confirmed cases of measles in parts of Essex.
      • Wandsworth's riverside quarters have seen particularly steep rises in income in recent years.
      • God is back, according to a recent survey in which 59% said he was meaningful to them etc, representing a steep rise in religious feeling.

  • 2

    (excessive)
    • 2.1informal (of prices)

      alto
      excesivo
      he charged me $200 — that's a bit steep! me cobró 200 dólares — ¡qué caro! / ¡se le fue un poco la mano!
      • Today, people are paying steep prices for violating copyrights.
      • Sims had better deliver because the club paid a steep price, its third-round pick, to move up two spots to draft him.
      • For the sake of peace, Israel paid the steep price Oslo demanded.
      • Apart from Dravid who always puts a steep price on his wicket, the others have only confirmed that they are good wicket and good condition players.
      • He said the fares were being kept down to reasonable levels despite the steep increase in petrol prices.
      • Property in the popular Lake Como area usually achieves a healthy resale value but, as in all scenic parts of Italy, prices are steep.
      • What we endeavour to find are quality wines that don't come at a steep price, and these seem to be rare.
      • Although prices are steep, there is a huge demand for high-quality property in Europe's top ski resorts.
      • The atmosphere was completely casual and relaxed - despite the steep prices, fancy location and posh decor.
      • Rear seat space limited, price is steep, if you use all the performance of the car you will drop well below 30 mpg.
      • Tens of thousands of lives seem a steep price to pay to give diplomacy a chance.
      • Prices are steep, with rooms beginning at 130 euros a night, meals excluded.
      • But families exercise that right at the steep price of losing income they otherwise would have earned.
      • Prices are steep, with 10,000 euros for silver club membership and 50,000 euros to join the gold club.
      • By making our own franchises we'll ultimately make more money instead of paying a steep price for an existing brand that may or may not work.
      • Merchants could pay a steep price for stiffing shoppers.
      • But banks could end up paying a steep price for such fees if any of the complex deals start to unravel - a higher risk in the middle of an economic downturn.
      • The service was amicable, the ambience was charming, and though the prices were fairly steep for Sofia standards, the experience was worth it.
      • Those who obstruct and resist will pay a steep price.
      • However, thanks to its extra frills like a high-resolution screen and the camera, it retails at a steep price of $999.

    • 2.2informal (unreasonable)

      poco razonable
      it's a bit steep to expect them to work without a break no es muy razonable que digamos, esperar que trabajen sin un descanso


There are 2 main translations of steep in Spanish

: steep1steep2

steep2

remojar, v.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (to soften, clean) remojar
    (to soften, clean) dejar en remojo
    (to soften, clean) dejar a remojo
    (to flavor) macerar
    • I ordered some hot water to steep my raspberry leaf in and took out my little baggy full of the herb and set it on the table.
    • The garbanzo plants exuded a flavorful, acidic dew which made for a wonderful sun tea when the leaves were steeped in a jar of water.
    • Originally only consisting of three seats, the new Green T House is 50,000 square feet of slightly wavy lines and designer hot water steeping designer tea leaves.
    • Wet-milling involves several steps, starting with soaking, or steeping, corn in water and sulfur dioxide for 24 to 36 hours.
    • They were made by distilling or steeping herbs and flowers, and by mixing aromatic oils with alcohol.
    • I used to spray with hot peppers and garlic steeped in water, which seemed to not only repel furry critters but also aphids.
    • According to Meech, a number of Japanese dealers went him one better, and aged prints by steeping them in tea or a solution of soot and water.
    • Make the compress by steeping 1 teaspoon dried chamomile flowers or 1 chamomile tea bag in 1 cup boiling hot water for 20 minutes.
    • Stella is her own cookbook, and she began by steeping orange pekoe tea bags for sweet tea.
    • During conventional wet milling, corn is steeped for 24 to 36 hours in water and sulfur dioxide to begin the separation of the starch and protein connections.
    • Trillium Herbal's exfoliating sea salt polish is steeped in wonderful organic essential oils including sesame, jojoba, olive and sunflower.
    • Cover the mixture, steep for two hours, then strain it through muslin cloth into a suitable watering can or pump-spray bottle.
    • I sometimes get really neurotic about steeping my tea for the exact amount of time, and if I go a few seconds over the recommended time the tea tastes too bitter to me.
    • You also can steep herbs in hot water for caffeine-free teas.
    • I was still amused by this all; I had never actually seen someone go to the trouble of coming to a café so they could get water, and steep their own tea.
    • They will have already been bathed in a ritual on their ninth day, in water steeped with herbs and leaves.
    • If powered tea is not available, make steeped green tea from tea bags bought at the grocery store.
    • Lemon grass also makes a refreshing tea when steeped in boiled water.
    • Make the tea by steeping 1 teaspoon or 1 tea bag of one of these dried herbs in 1 cup of hot water for 15 minutes.
    • If you want the cider to also deter insects, gently steep some tomato leaves therein along with other strong aromatics like cedar.
    • Tea was steeped, cakes and cookies presented, comfortable seats procured for the triplet to lounge in.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (fruit) macerarse
  • 2

    (tea) estar en infusión
    let the tea steep for 5 minutes deje el té en infusión 5 minutos
    • the tea is steeping el té se está haciendo