Translation of strangle in Spanish:

strangle

estrangular, v.

Pronunciation /ˈstræŋɡəl//ˈstraŋɡ(ə)l/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (person) estrangular
    • I had to severely restrain myself from strangling her right there and then.
    • She felt as if an invisible hand was upon her neck, strangling her with an iron grip.
    • The court declared the man guilty of strangling his sister to death with a telephone cord.
    • Sometimes, I felt like strangling him to death.
    • He escaped, but his kinsman later strangled him to death.
    • I wanted to grab her by the neck and strangle her.
    • An urge to strangle the older girl was suppressed.
    • It took all my will power to keep myself from strangling that person to death.
    • Was she smothered, was she strangled, why wasn't there any blood?
    • Alex's cold hands went to Michelle's neck, and strangled her for dear life.
    • She showed them, but the thieves were still unsatisfied and nearly strangled her to death.
    • But suddenly, she had both hands around his neck and was strangling him.
    • Tatsuya brought his face closer, grabbing Tomoya's neck, strangling him slightly.
    • When I get my hands on her, I'm going to strangle her until her neck is two inches thick!
    • Jason wrestled the weapon from his foe's hands, and, right there, strangled him to death.
    • Then, in some unexplained way, the sprocket chain tore loose and managed to wrap itself about the boy's neck, strangling him.
    • Sara wrapped her legs around Dallas's waist and held on to his neck almost strangling him.
    • He had strangled a prostitute to death when she disagreed with him.
    • Dougal thrust Gino backward into the wall, his fingers tight around his neck, literally strangling him.
    • Finally, he strangled her to death with a gauze bandage.
  • 2

    (originality) coartar
    (protests) sofocar
    (protests) ahogar
    to strangle the economy estrangular la economía
    • If it were true, it would strangle any hopes for better relations with the United States.
    • In the end, the fear of ideas strangles the drama, because it renders the film's protagonists' struggle to survive devoid of larger meaning.
    • She believes that the new measures could be valuable but said there was a risk that the benefits could be strangled by bureaucracy and costs.
    • Put a face to the obscene greed that's strangling our beloved country!
    • Why should excess consumption strangle economic growth?
    • In practice, their lives are devoured by activities and strangled with attachments.
    • Economies die more slowly, strangled by fear and despair.
    • Is that strangling the nascent ‘alarm tone’ market?
    • I have firm proposals to reduce the bureaucracy which is strangling farming.
    • Their interests diverge from ours, and their control over the network strangles our ability to communicate.
    • The strategic struggle for Afghanistan was a fight to strangle the other's logistics.
    • Then the Nigerians will fan across Monrovia, seize the port and allow humanitarian access to the strangled city.
    • His family acquired wealth beyond their wildest dreams and a measure of power that still strangles the development of democracy in Chile.
    • Plans have been drawn up to safeguard Cumbria's thriving local meat industry from being strangled by bureaucracy.
    • Business is telling us that an assembly would strangle growth.
    • In Wharton's world, other people and the rigid expectations of stratified society conspire to strangle individual happiness.
    • Is this country so bound up in red tape that compassion has been strangled?
    • The pattern is familiar: vested interests rage against change and do their best to strangle it by cynically invoking such shibboleths as tradition, the family and the sanctity of Sunday.
    • It says less about the logic of reform than about the poverty of a debate that's strangled by interest groups and ideology on both sides.
    • As Radcliffe shattered a world record in each one it appeared that she became more and more strangled by her own expectations and those of others.
  • 3strangled past p

    ahogado
    a strangled cry un grito ahogado
    • in a strangled voice con voz ahogada / estrangulada

intransitive verb

  • 1

    ahogarse
    I almost strangled on a fishbone casi me ahogo con una espina de pescado