Translation of succor in Spanish:

succor

socorro, n.

(British succour)

Pronunciation /ˈsʌkə//ˈsəkər/

noun

literary

  • 1

    socorro masculine
    to give succor to the weak and helpless socorrer al débil y al indefenso
    • These newcomers earned their living as small businessmen, religious teachers or labourers and were later to provide succour and support for the third wave of Indonesian migration to Thailand.
    • The harbour provided safety and succour to seafarers over the centuries.
    • They provide psychological succor and social support, enabling them to endure the tragic elements of the human condition and to overcome the fragility of human life in the scheme of things.
    • It also dwells on the doctor-patient relationship, tragic situations in the life of patients and how as a medical professional with great concern for his fellow beings, he has tried to bring relief and succour to them.
    • When you are half way up Kilimanjaro and your lungs are close to bursting as you seek to drag in even a wisp of the thin air, you are willing to seek anywhere for help and succour and appeals to god are not uncommon.
    • Jewish tradition provided our Prophet with sanctuary and succour.
    • Music is the all time succour, as it helps in healing old wounds and hostilities.
    • Victims' families had no protection, no succour or support.
    • The rest of the story is then structured around God's provision of succour and support for him.
    • First, while in Gujarat, I met many individuals who remain anonymous, who were so distressed by what had happened that they worked tirelessly round the clock to help provide succour.
    • But whoever assumes this role, their supporters can at least derive succour from the infinite spirit of the Highlanders.
    • For much joy and indeed fun has been invested in improving this cherished local institution, a place which provides succour and comfort to those in their time of greatest need.
    • His role, as he sees it, is simple: he's there to ease our passing, to provide momentary succour to our loved ones in a time of grief.
    • We are aware that through a time of increasing food deprivation a number of individual churches have run much needed feeding schemes, and provided succour and support for AIDS victims.
    • Western churches have a clear responsibility to provide succour and support for the Iraqi church in this time of trauma.
    • These bodies are giving succour and support to the British forces in Ireland and as such they are collaborators.
    • It is true that all NGOs, except those exclusively concerned with succour and relief, are about change.
    • You need a network of supporters and sympathisers prepared to hide and give succour, financial and otherwise for the cause.
    • He fully shares the hospital's concept of providing succour and medical help to the underprivileged section of our society.
    • For Maud Martha, the house serves dual roles as the site of both her distress and her succor.

transitive verb

literary

  • 1

    socorrer