Translation of taboo in Spanish:

taboo

tabú, adj.

Pronunciation: /təˈbu//tæˈbu//təˈbuː/

adjective

  • 1

    tabú
    • As they saw it, many details concerning clan histories and taboo places have been forgotten over the past few generations.
    • For many it is a taboo subject which leaves people feeling isolated and vulnerable.
    • Al-Jazeera gives air-time to their Arab leaders' opponents and to ordinary viewers and discusses taboo political and social topics.
    • Hearing them talk, you'd have thought the very subject was taboo: awe, wonder and, yes, fear crept into their voices.
    • Contraception and abortion - once taboo topics - have been enshrined into law.
    • In the Solomon Islands, shrines are always taboo places.
    • In front of the big screen this behaviour is generally considered taboo.
    • Divorce is still taboo in some cultures - find an immigrant family that has been rocked by one.
    • In the not too distant past, talk of sex was strictly taboo.
    • As society engages in dialogue on these issues no subject will be taboo.
    • Why do you think sex is still so taboo in the U.S.?
    • The hornets are numerous down in that cave; we do not touch it; it is taboo.
    • Totems of specific clans, healers, or royal dynasties are taboo to certain members of some ethnic groups.
    • On a day for women, culturally taboo subjects like female sexuality can be openly acknowledged.
    • Previously taboo areas were opened for examination, and laws and legal attitudes were modified.
    • But his live show is much more casually cruel, and no matter how sensitive a subject, nothing is taboo for his one-liners.
    • As a writer, he comes across as someone who feels that by trumpeting loudly about a taboo subject he is breaking down social barriers.
    • But whether it should be taboo even to discuss such issues, as some are arguing, is another question.
    • I mean it doesn't mean that I want to be rude, it's not that, it's just that you go to certain spaces that are taboo.
    • Certain subjects are taboo, or too emotive to be examined with objectivity.
    • The fact that the subject is taboo also means that a man who is traumatized by the experience may be retraumatized again and again, with each child born to him.
    • Our culture has become distinctly sexualised over the past 20 years, and subjects that were once taboo are now openly discussed.
    • Not only taboo places but also mountain tops were known to be frequented by spirits.
    • Information and counseling on once taboo subjects are now freely available, yet traditional mores still predominate.
    • Christianity was another force that was gradually eliminating dangers from spirits based at taboo sites.
    • The topic is so taboo that it almost can't be talked about.
    • Once taboo, birth control and family planning are quietly available to discreet couples.

noun

  • 1

    tabú masculine