Translation of thorn in Spanish:


espina, n.

Pronunciation: /θɔːn//θɔrn/


  • 1

    espina feminine
    to be a thorn in sb's flesh / side ser una espina que algn tiene clavada
    • I could easily compare her to a rose: a beautiful flower with piercing thorns.
    • But I'm so inherently Texan I love it all - the stickers, the spikes, the thorns, the burrs, the nettles, and the rocks.
    • Certain plants have developed thorns to prevent themselves from being devoured and they work equally well as deterrents for humans too.
    • Nearly all of the plant life protects itself with thorns, barbs and needles.
    • Due to the proposed similarity in function among thorns, spines, and prickles, we will hereafter generically refer to all plants bearing them as armed.
    • Sweating on an assembly line, she strips thorns from flowers bound for countries where people can afford such luxuries.
    • Having bare feet also made it easier to grip when following a ridge and, since there was not the faintest trace of vegetation anywhere, there was no danger from thorns.
    • I just keep staring at the rose, the petals, the long yellow stamens, stem, the fat red thorns, wanting to say so much.
    • The Romans considered holly to be lucky, and it was later accepted as a symbol by the church - its sharp leaves likened to the thorns worn by Jesus and its berries to the drops of Christ's blood.
    • The untrained eye cannot always distinguish between a blackberry and a raspberry, since the shapes and sizes of the fruit, leaves, and thorns vary, and there are both red blackberries and black raspberries.
    • Here in south Texas, where the mesquite brush and most other native plants have thorns and where not a few critters have a mean bite, it helps to be tough.
    • Roses ramble over walls, branches stiff with thorns and laden with huge blossoms.
    • It is very difficult to miss this flower with its very vibrant orange leaves and dangerous thorns.
    • The rural imagery is varied: the rising sap, meadows, individual plants, birds, a bedewed rose among its thorns, storm, flood, and fair weather.
    • The thorns on the rose stem pressed into his skin but he ignored the pain.
    • Plants also possess a great diversity of physical resistance traits, such as spines and thorns.
    • Workers spray rose bushes, harvest stems, strip them of thorns and pluck the blemished petals.
    • Her finger caught on one of the thorns hidden beneath a leaf.
    • Experts have known for some time that cheetahs are particularly prone to eye injuries from thorns and spikes.
    • The door was engraved with carvings of dead and live roses with long stems and sharp thorns.
    • With the sun at its highest and the birds falling silent, I had a short siesta under a thorn tree.
    • ‘They threw me over the back of a camel and told me they would kill me if I cried,’ he said, sitting quietly under a thorn tree on the outskirts of Turalei.
    • Along the banks grew knob thorns, sausage trees, vegetable ivory, ilala palms, mangoes, wild figs, tamarinds and mahogany, as well as the ubiquitous acacia.
    • She could see a forest surrounding the town, dense and thick, full of dark, tangled trees and thorns that looked scary and uninviting.
    • Instead of a well-equipped school their children are taught beneath the shade of a thorn tree.
    • Huge clusters of thorn bushes, fungus, tree roots and a carpet of dead leaves and pine needles made walking a chore.
    • The lions chased him, and savaged his leg before he fell into a thorn bush too dense for them to reach him.
    • The camels seem to enjoy bunches of dry-looking thorn bush.
    • I sit beside my flowering thorn and drink a little wine.
    • To this day, a large and twisted thorn tree - the ‘Friar's Thorn’ - grows on the mound where the ceremonies were carried out and it is near here that the ‘Friar's Stone’ is located.
    • Point out any potential hazards to the child, such as thorn bushes or poison ivy.
    • In the autumn we intend to plant fruiting species of trees, including gelda rose, hawthorn, hazel, thorn and snowberry.
    • Pretty soon I sat up with a jerk as something was thrashing like mad in the thorn bush above my head.
    • The undergrowth of thorns and shrubs was bad enough, but in addition the whole place was chock-full of a sort of reed with long leaves about an inch or so broad.
    • Slowly we progress across the crimson lakes of sand, silver pools of sand, enormous hillocks of sand, skirting giant rocks and stubbornly vibrant patches of thorn bush.
    • When he reached Glastonbury he planted his staff, which then took root and grew into a thorn tree.
    • I wish to draw everybody's attention to the great value of all established indigenous trees and of camel thorn trees in particular.
  • 2

    espino masculine