There are 4 main translations of tick in Spanish

: tick1tick2tick3tick4

tick1

tic, n.

Pronunciation /tɪk//tɪk/

noun

  • 1

    • 1.1(sound)

      tic masculine
      tick, tock tic, tac
      • Each tick of the clock was accompanied by the amplified sound of a human heartbeat.
      • At this time of night, the tick of the clock synchronises itself with my heartbeat.
      • The second will be defined to be so many ticks of the standard clock.
      • They sat silently for a few minutes, the tick of the clock on the mantle and crackling of the fire in the fireplace now very loud in the silence.
      • The grandfather clock's never ending ticks echoed throughout the pub.
      • It is an artificial construct of man that simply represents the number of ticks from a clock.
      • If we need the high order positions of the number, they will be ready in two ticks (one clock cycle).
      • Three seconds, three ticks of the clock, and the transformation from smoke to human was complete.
      • In a sport in which the times are measured in hundredths of a second, she beat Giove, who took second, by 20 ticks of the clock.
      • This blog started out a long time ago when what I concentrated on was the daily droplets; the tick of the clock, the squeak of the mouse, etc.
      • It was regular, a beat; not quite a tap, more of a tick.
      • The tireless tick of the clock could be heard during lulls in the conversation.
      • With just 1.8 ticks left on the clock and the ball, Pitt inserted a severely hobbled Knight into the lineup who hit the front rim on a 70-foot launch.
      • He argues as if a tick of the clock, viz. the arrival of the Middle Ages, could cause the widespread destruction which India suffered.
      • Women no longer fear the tick of the biological clock, as medical technology has proved that those with the money can pay to have it turned back.
      • She so loves the heartbeat of a clock: the tick, the pause, the lock.
      • The tick of this pulsar clock is very regular, a sharp pulse every 0.059 second.
      • If it hadn't have been so loud, I'd have totally counted down the seconds until freedom just by the ticks on the clock above the whiteboard.
      • By using the very basis of matter, we can define the second to be 9,192,631,770 ticks of the caesium clock.
      • The obnoxious tick of the clock clicked annoyingly over the thunder itself.
      • They seemingly had the game in hand but New Mexico State hit with just 3 ticks left on the clock before Sparks hit the money ball from the corner pocket.

    • 1.2British informal (moment)

      segundito masculine
      wait a tick espera un segundito
      • I'll be back in half a tick or in a tick or in two ticks enseguida vuelvo
      • No, but, I mean, hang on a tick, it's how well a film can convince you of that.

  • 2British

    (mark)
    tic masculine
    marca feminine
    visto masculine Spain
    palomita feminine Mexico
    • Each tick mark indicates that a nucleotide within the strain differs from the consensus sequence.
    • The tick marks on the x-axes represent genetic markers.
    • If any running column total exceeds 11, subtract 11 and put a tick mark in that column.
    • The translator now translates each string and switches the yellow question mark to a green tick when completed.
    • Then it's in or out, a tick or a cross, Mr or Ms Right or Mr / Ms No Thank You Very Much.
    • Over a hundred ticks marked the space beneath the heading.
    • The chromosome maps are given below the images, with black tick marks indicating the position of markers.
    • And there's ticks and crosses to indicate everyone's preferences.
    • I have a tick with a question mark next to paragraph 93, and paragraph 94 just does not follow on the facts.
    • The original entry on the record read ‘IV Anti-D’, followed by a tick.
    • ‘You can call the agents tomorrow,’ said Graham, poring over his to-do list, all ticks and crossings out.
    • In a nursing home or ward the routine is that every patient has a care plan that is religiously filled in every day with ticks or crosses - has he eaten a balanced diet?
    • By extension, some might put a tick mark in the loss column for Rosenhaus.
    • I also have a lounge that smells pretty, and several ticks next to names on the Christmas list.
    • A map of the Urus-Martan area is black from ticks and marks indicating ordnance.
    • Graham's to-do list is now a mess of ticks and crossings-out, with only one job left to do.
    • The use of the hyphen to divide words at the ends of lines of text dates from the 14c, and evolved from a marginal tick or check mark used to show that the final word of a line was not complete.
    • The paper then comes back with a tick or a cross on it and nothing more!
    • A tick indicates that the sentence is true that day; a blank that it is not.
    • Each feature description also included a screenshot and a tick mark indicating whether it made significant use of graphics or not.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (watch/clock) hacer tictac
    • I sunk lower in my seat and watched the clock tick.
    • We were quiet for a few minutes; the only sound was the clock ticking on the wall.
    • And, finally, as the clock ticks past five-thirty in the evening and you know the agent is shutting up shop for the day, realizing that you've wasted a perfectly good day.
    • The calendar is loaded, the meter is ticking and that damn clock has to be fast, doesn't it?
    • Want to be fully informed as the calendar ticks over to 2003?
    • As the clock ticks in the short interview, it becomes apparent that a new line of questioning is in order before things spin out of control.
    • The clock had barely started ticking in the second period before Killie equalised.
    • The clock on the wall ticked on, its sound echoing through the otherwise silent room.
    • Reporters spend most of their time reporting and then as the clock ticks, start banging away at the keys.
    • He slid out of bed into the darkness and picked up his cellphone, watching the numbers on the clock tick.
    • She watched the plastic hands tick off each second.
    • Gardner and teammates watched helplessly as the final six seconds ticked off the clock.
    • I think I had watched the clock tick for 4 hours when it claimed only ten minutes had go by.
    • I watched the clock tick off the seconds, and finally click over into place.
    • AS THE clock ticks past midnight and today moves into tomorrow, the new world rankings will be spat out from a computer in Florida.
    • She suddenly took notice of what sounded like a clock ticking.
    • All that could be heard besides the patter of raindrops against the window was the sound of the clock ticking off the seconds.
    • As the final seconds ticked off the clock, the shocked Scots found themselves on the losing sideline for the fifth time this season and the fourth time in as many weeks.
    • Measuring motions in this absolute space also required a universal clock, which ticked off the seconds for all the inhabitants of the cosmos.
    • The first act is played with the sound of a clock ticking and whistling wind running through it, setting a foreboding atmosphere.
    • Instead, her eyes stayed open, staring into the dark, and she watched the luminescent numbers on her clock tick slowly by.

transitive verb

British

  • 1

    (name/answer) (con un tic o una marca etc.) marcar
    tick the correct box marque la casilla correspondiente
    • By Sun standards this is subtle stuff but the message could not be more obvious: readers are being coaxed into ticking the box marked ‘bad outweighs good’.
    • Participants were asked to explain why they had never used the Internet via a basic tick box.
    • Those stopped in the street and asked if they are ‘minded to make a big purchase’ will continue to tick the box marked ‘no’.
    • He is a happy man, journey justified, as he ticks this bird off his list.
    • In his leather bag he has an alphabetic list which he fastidiously ticks off after each visit.
    • One day they were busy ticking the days off and I just though that's it - we're having Christmas early.
    • Most of the 600,000 are palpably unmoved, merely ticking the place off their list.
    • ‘Those who consider themselves British, but have Irish roots, can still tick the Irish box’.
    • So you're ticking those days off on the calendar?

There are 4 main translations of tick in Spanish

: tick1tick2tick3tick4

tick2

garrapata, n.

Pronunciation /tɪk//tɪk/

noun

Zoology

  • 1

    garrapata feminine
    • Scorpions are arachnids, relatives of spiders and ticks.
    • It takes 24 hours for a tick to transmit Lyme disease, so rapid removal is important.
    • Symptoms usually appear within a week of infection but may develop up to 30 days after the tick bite.
    • Mites and ticks which feed on vertebrate hair or blood often carry disease organisms, such as spirochete bacteria, responsible for relapsing fever and Lyme disease.
    • Not all ticks carry Lyme disease, which is most commonly spread to humans in the nymph stage of a tick's life.
    • Those who cannot make their own fame will feed off the fame of others like a tick sucking the blood out of a dog.
    • Do a tick check every few hours or more often if in heavily infested areas.
    • Lyme disease, a disease transmitted by ticks, is the most common insect-borne illness in the United States.
    • For example, reforestation in the United States and Europe is responsible for an increase in Lyme disease as deer ticks have more opportunities to find human hosts.
    • It usually takes eight to 48 hours for a tick to transmit diseases after it's dug in.
    • More than a nuisance, fleas and ticks can transmit a host of pathogens and skin diseases to humans and their furry counterparts.
    • You often pick up ticks when walking through bracken, and they're best removed quickly if they attach themselves to you.
    • And only a small percentage of people who are bitten by a deer tick get Lyme disease.
    • Lyme disease is transmitted by ticks, no bigger than a pin-head that normally live on deer.
    • It also repels and kills deer ticks that may transmit Lyme Disease.
    • With Lyme disease, embedded ticks have moved from disgusting to dangerous.
    • Usually at the moment of the stinging, the ticks release anaesthetic substances, which makes the place of bite invisible and people are unaware of what has happened.
    • Large ticks may carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, while the smaller, pinhead-size deer ticks can harbour Lyme disease.
    • Typically, ticks wait on vegetation and jump on your shoes, socks, or pants when you walk by.
    • The tick attaches itself to the skin of the host and sucks its blood.

There are 4 main translations of tick in Spanish

: tick1tick2tick3tick4

tick3

funda, n.

Pronunciation /tɪk//tɪk/

noun

  • 1

    (fabric case)
    funda feminine
    • She'd hidden a straw tick in the shed, and a crock of chilled butter for her welts.
    • I clambered into the straw tick ungracefully and flopped down, clothes and all.
    • ‘Yes sir,’ she whispered as Jeeka entered the house with the full straw ticks.
    • They reach for the money, which is very close to where Huck is standing, and move it to the straw tick under the feather bed.
    • He quickly reached the top and started throwing down ticks, pillows and blankets.
    • We passed through that room and into he next where a straw tick was laid on the wooden floor.
  • 2

    (fabric)

There are 4 main translations of tick in Spanish

: tick1tick2tick3tick4

tick4

Pronunciation /tɪk//tɪk/

noun

British
informal

  • 1

    (credit)
    to buy sth on tick comprar algo (de) fiado informal
    • Billy puts about a million dollars worth of party things, including the biggest possible marquee, on tick.
    • A miracle-worker who virtually robbed Peter to pay Paul, she'd get things on tick and then save to pay people back.
    • What can possibly be the answer to the funding crisis facing budding start-ups wanting to get IT kit on tick?
    • Living on tick, Adam sees nothing for it but to hop back aboard the carousel of fashionable metropolitan parties.
    • If you buy it on tick it'll be worn out before you've finished paying for it.
    • It also means the good countries can operate on tick for years.
    • We are too fond of living for the day, of buying on tick and the never-never.
    • It's a sign of changed circumstances in the Valley that another growth area is the repossession of cars bought on tick, whose owners can no longer afford to keep up the repayments.