Translation of tiller in Spanish:


caña del timón, n.

Pronunciation: /ˈtɪlər//ˈtɪlə/


  • 1

    caña del timón feminine
    barra del timón feminine
    at the tiller (of ship) al timón
    • She quickly got dressed and made her way up to the deck, going to grasp the tiller happily.
    • He grabbed the tiller and turned the boat towards the Tradewind.
    • Steered with a tiller, Cayuga maxed out at six knots, well under the Canal's 10-mph speed limit.
    • I let him sort out the rudder and tiller, as we're late, and he's starting to worry.
    • The sailors below went about their morning duties; checking the tiller, adjusting the sails, tightening the riggings.
    • It was through these tunnels Taffle brought the boat, deftly maneuvering the tiller.
    • Firmly he pushed the tiller away from him and steered the boat into the wind.
    • The ship's tiller was on an elevated platform that could only be reached by a polished set of crystalline stairs.
    • To minimize maintenance, the only wood used in the entire boat is the tiller and the only opening to the area below deck is the companionway.
    • With one hand on the tiller, she navigated her way into clear blue waters.
    • A firm hand at the tiller and the boat sails fair.
    • There's the main sheet (the rope which controls the main sail), the tiller (the steering stick), the jib (the front sail) and a lot more coloured rope.
    • They don't have rudders or tillers or handles or anything with which you might steer.
    • Christopher takes the decision to stop sailing, lashing the tiller to the same side as the reefed mainsail.
    • The comparison is done many times each second with any deviation resulting in a correcting movement of the tiller or the wheel.
    • She glanced to the aft, where the Captain stood, one hand on the tiller, the other holding a spyglass to his eye.
    • For steering, there was, surprisingly, a long tiller, aft on the upper deck.
    • It is very much like turning the tiller on a boat to deflect the wake on the boat and alter its course.
    • The tiller can be easily removed to allow more useable space for entertaining while dockside or at anchor.
    • A succinct and authoritative commentary on handling the tiller and self-balancing side rudder of such ships was given by Shetelig and Falk in 1937.