Translation of transatlantic in Spanish:


transatlántico, adj.

Pronunciation /ˌtransatˈlantɪk//ˌtrɑːnzatˈlantɪk//ˌtrɑːnsatˈlantɪk//ˌtrænsətˈlæn(t)ɪk//ˌtranzatˈlantɪk//ˌtrænzətˈlæn(t)ɪk/


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    (journey/phone call) transatlántico
    (accent) (American) americano
    (accent) (British) británico
    our transatlantic cousins nuestros hermanos del otro lado del Atlántico
    • His instincts seemed transatlantic as much as European.
    • Half its output is American; its vernacular looks and sounds transatlantic.
    • The bitter truth is that Europe lags behind our transatlantic cousin in almost every area.
    • Seen from a transatlantic perspective Britain is deeply mired into European affairs.
    • ‘We are looking forward to finding ways to strengthen Ukraine's integration into Europe and the transatlantic community,’ she said.
    • The white population grew rapidly up to about 1660 when it reached 47,000, constituting some 40 per cent of all the whites in Britain's transatlantic colonies.
    • In the meantime, Britain's transport infrastructure has slowly rotted to the point where it is now an antiquated relic compared to many of our rather sharper European and transatlantic rivals.
    • I rather suspect that this is yet another example of our British culture being permeated by transatlantic influences.
    • Except that, in today's Britain, the only muffins available are transatlantic impostors.
    • In good old colonial fashion, the British have always scorned their transatlantic cousins.
    • This had been the dream of the transatlantic Enlightenment, and throughout the Cold War American leaders argued on its behalf in the struggle against Communism.
    • The presiding deity of British pirate radio at the time was a fast-talking expat American who called himself, with standard transatlantic hyperbole, Emperor Rosko.
    • First - with apologies to transatlantic readers - this is all a bit American, isn't it?