Translation of trefoil in Spanish:

trefoil

trébol, n.

Pronunciation /ˈtriːfɔɪl//ˈtrɛfɔɪl//ˈtrɛfˌɔɪl//ˈtriˌfɔɪl/

noun

  • 1

    Botany trébol masculine
    Botany trifolio masculine
    Architecture trifolio masculine
    • Saint Patrick used a seamróg, called a trefoil or three-leaf clover, to illustrate the concept of the trinity to the people.
    • Her sea-pinks, meadow-sweet, hairbells, daisies, trefoils, orchids and clovers are all still there in a rich rug of purples, blues, pinks, yellows and creams.
    • At the tops of the windows, the artist has fun with the trefoils and quatrefoils, turning one into a black flower with yellow petals and another into a hovering cartoonlike form ringed by orange dots.
    • Rather like the Venetians - the difference being that Venice went on evolving: its Byzantine ogees and trefoils made room for Palladio and all that.
    • Because trefoils are legumes, they fix nitrogen into the soil for later use by grasses and forbs.
    • To this fusion are added Gothic style elements in the legs (a rounded arch above and a trefoil below each), colorful French ceramics with a Moorish flavor, and exotic serpents on either side of the ceramic cylinder.
    • The trefoil within the upper squares finds no counterpart above Gideon and the Burning Bush, though the tracery here falsely suggests an answering trefoil.
    • This ancient breed (Neolithic bones reveal its ancestry here) graze on heather grassland rich with wild flowers and herbs such as thyme, violets, orchids, primroses or bird's foot trefoil.
    • In its first year, the Buzz Project found that in fields containing margins of natural clovers and trefoils an average 1,850 bumble bees were found per hectare.
    • It is sometimes called wild chervil; and also has the names honewort (used of the closely related C. canadensis in N. America) and trefoil (but this last is used of other plants also).
    • In addition, the top areas of the main windows are decorated with stone tracery describing trefoils, quatrefoils and Moorish arches.
    • Although the trefoil, bell, and other tracery figures had previously appeared in mural decoration, they acquired exceptional importance around 1500.