Translation of unsociable in Spanish:

unsociable

insociable, adj.

Pronunciation /ʌnˈsəʊʃəb(ə)l//ˌənˈsoʊʃəb(ə)l/

adjective

  • 1

    (disposition/person) insociable
    (person/disposition) poco sociable
    (person/disposition) huraño
    they're an unsociable lot no son nada sociables
    • he called me at an unsociable hour me llamó a una hora intempestiva
    • There are farmers who are a worry because they stay at home, become unsociable and withdraw.
    • Marshall plays unsociable, awkward detective Luke Stone, and his senior officer and partner is played by Amanda Donohoe.
    • A lonely man,… shy, distrustful, unsociable, irritable and brusque.
    • An Englishwoman, who met him in Burma, where his main intellectual pursuit was reading the Adelphi magazine, thought him ‘brusque and unsociable with no small talk’.
    • You'd think a little boy this popular would forget about a girl who was quiet and unsociable like him, but no… He would always find a way to make sure I wasn't alone, wasn't left out.
    • Even twenty seven years into the past, you're still that quiet, unsociable, ghostlike little twit who sits in the back in math class and draws pictures of beings with emerald wings and golden eyes.
    • That's the point of me being rude and cold and unsociable.
    • For someone whose lifelong tendency in human interaction has ranged from detached to to unsociable and sometimes all the way to bitchy, it's very strange to find myself becoming pleasant, cordial, and downright nice.
    • We also have our own animal behaviourist, so if there are problems, she also takes a lot of the dogs in agility training, which is quite amazing because very often it is your most unsociable dog that takes to agility.
    • They were serious alcoholics, each consuming a bottle of brandy a day, so Hugh kept them company in the habit of drinking, not to seem unsociable, and enjoyed beating them at ping-pong.
    • Second, of course, is that I'm notoriously unsociable anyway.
    • The same survey suggests we are rearing a generation of unsociable and reticent youngsters.
    • Manet was charming, with a richer, warmer, more responsive personality; the unsociable, caustic Degas was guarded and hostile.
    • He lost his hair, wrote with a trembling hand and later became withdrawn and unsociable - mercury poisoning can do this to you.
    • It is possible that the smaller dog felt threatened all the more so because he was held on a tight leash; alternatively, he may simply be unsociable.
    • You are absolutely the most rude, unsociable, uncivilized person I know!
    • She said that lately you've become quiet, unsociable, just… odd.
    • Once settled into this one, in tune with its surly, unsociable central character, columnist and freelance reporter Frank Corso, the reader will be reluctant to set the book aside, even for meals.
    • However, an even worse attitude is shown by his mother, who dares to question the distribution of leaflets justifiably vilifying her unsociable son.
    • Thus you appear somewhat unsociable and aloof.