There are 2 main translations of vet in Spanish

: vet1vet2

vet1

veterinario, n.

Pronunciation /vɛt//vɛt/

noun

Veterinary Science

  • 1

    veterinario masculine
    veterinaria feminine
    • We took him to the vet and the vet said, ‘Look, you've got to put him on a diet’.
    • The NFU has told MPs that action is needed to staunch the flow of vets away from private farm animal practices into pet care as a result of the farming crisis.
    • This will allow the vet to insure the dog's health as well as test for parasites that may be there.
    • But the figures, revealed to Channel Four News by senior vets, will fuel anger among farmers who feel their healthy animals were slaughtered for no reason.
    • He reported the case immediately to the local veterinary station and two vets came to the farm within half an hour to find another 200 ducks had died.
    • A genuinely sick or orphaned fledgling should be taken - along with a detailed note of where it was found - to your nearest vet or RSPCA centre for treatment.
    • Once the commission is persuaded, it might make a proposal to the European Standing Veterinary Committee, an organisation made up of professional vets from each of the member nations.
    • The dog was taken in by the RSPCA where a vet also discovered an elastic band embedded into its neck.
    • Your vet or veterinary nurse will need to write a small description of the weight loss programme and send the entry off by the closing date of October 13, 2000.
    • Richard Gowshall, a vet at the Eastcott Veterinary Clinic, was shocked to hear Daisy had given birth to another 14 puppies.
    • Most vets agree spaying and neutering should be done not sooner than 6 months of age.
    • A group of 30 homeopathic vets, in a letter to the Veterinary Times, said many vaccinations lasted for years and did not require an annual booster.
    • They're also packed with information about the world of veterinary medicine, especially the brand practiced by those vets who specialize in large animals.
    • If your dog is old or in poor health, check with your vet before increasing exercise.
    • They also work with local vets, the RSPCA and local kennels, assisting dog and cat owners in the care and re-homing of their animals.
    • The spokesman said the animals were inspected by the RSPCA and a government vet.
    • A vet recruited by the RSPCA said she couldn't be 100 per cent sure what led to the death but remains convinced that the dog was dead before it was put into the water.
    • A lot of vets have business relationships with other clinics, even if only an emergency vet.
    • Make sure to talk to your vet before using one of these hairball remedies for long periods of time though.
    • If the vets haven't managed to isolate a physical cause for Booger's behaviour then it could be time to start looking at psychological reasons for his behaviour.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (applicant) someter a investigación
    (proposal/application) examinar
    (application/proposal) investigar
    (videos/films) encargarse de la censura de
    to be positively vetted ser objeto de una investigación de antecedentes
    • Historically, the elected Council has been responsible for reviewing rule changes and vetting resolutions that come before the membership.
    • The lack of franchise regulations made vetting licensees that much more important.
    • Becker vetted the lists, using them as a starting point for future research questions.
    • Representatives of the American government, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund vet every potential oil contract.
    • In addition, Alliance retains legal counsel to vet its business practices, including diversity initiatives.
    • Now City of York Council says it recognises it was ‘not ideal’ to advertise free parking, and it will vet such adverts more carefully in future.
    • Reader Stephen Mills alerted us to the company's stringent security checks which vet potential purchasers.
    • Weapons of a certain power have to be licensed and everyone who applies for a licence is carefully vetted, and must keep their guns in locked, burglar-proof cupboards.
    • Complaints about alcohol advertising halved in 2003 following the introduction of the Central Copy Clearance system, which vets drinks ads in advance of their release.
    • For the vetting procedure, we have now established a procedure to scrutinize and meticulously vet our intelligence agencies' recruits.
    • They didn't vet the story the way they should have.
    • He was vetted by the Home Office when he helped set up the local youth offending team.
    • For example, anyone who has anything to do with cancer research should be vetted for links with carcinogen-producing industries.
    • Every man on Hannah's list has been personally vetted by Hannah with references followed up - and they are all police-checked.
    • The suggestion that people should be vetted before being allocated local authority housing is outrageous.
    • She liked to surround herself with attractive people and her portraits were carefully vetted to make sure that no physical flaws were ever revealed.
    • After an initial set of interviews, they were then vetted and approved by the War College's Commandant.
    • I was under the impression that all questions were vetted by you before they went on to the Order Paper.
    • All translators are vetted even for unclassified type work.
    • Even so, architects are carefully vetting developer agreements in hopes of deflecting litigation.
    • That's why the group adopted an interview process, whereby people could be vetted before being allowed to a ceremony.
    • He alleges that the charity discriminated against him by vetting him with the Northern Ireland Office.
    • The first is ensuring that everything about the move is vetted carefully by all major relevant actors.
    • Miller and her editors not only admit that the military vetted her story, they virtually boast of it.
    • The formation of any company requires that directors must be vetted and registered, while other large transactions require court documentation.
    • Have you made certain that all baby-sitters are vetted, especially relatives?
    • Two weeks ago ministers decided to require all new teaching staff to be vetted by the bureau.
    • The government's Film Bureau vets scripts, decides when, and if, the finished films can be screened, and whether they can be shown at foreign film festivals.
    • At his rallies, composed of carefully vetted supporters, people who oppose him have been thrown out and even arrested.
    • Mr J was to receive a ‘carefully and independently vetted account of the conclusions to be drawn from the risk analysis.’
    • I do get fan mail, but my agent vets it all before it comes to me, so I only get the nice stuff.
    • Those permitted to buy currency at this reduced rate are vetted, and do not include ordinary Zimbabweans.
    • They are too busy vetting serious proposals to schmooze with interesting companies that might not need cash right now.
    • It has further requested that it be allowed to vet any transcript of their evidence before it is made public - apparently to protect the identity of their agents.
    • In his 25 years in banking, former EBS general manager Michael Keane vetted many proposals from firms looking for money.
    • Hospital networks may have thousands of access points, making it impossible to restrict access solely to staff who have been personally vetted by each doctor.
    • It is thought that the directory will be one of only two in the country and it will include carefully vetted traders who cover a range of services from glazing to roofing.
    • This committee will vet forex loan proposals in excess of $500 million, and give its view to the central bank on the merits of the same.
    • Jenner growled at her listeners, described some of the women who rang in as ‘stupid’ and criticised producers for vetting her calls.
    • At the same time, candidates for important jobs within the Mexican government were vetted with the international financiers.

There are 2 main translations of vet in Spanish

: vet1vet2

vet2

veterano, n.

Pronunciation /vɛt//vɛt/

noun

US
informal

  • 1

    (veteran)
    veterano masculine
    veterana feminine
    • We simply can't let these vets go without help, because we saw after Vietnam what the long-term repercussions of that negligence can be.
    • Two-thirds of combat vets think the war is worth fighting.
    • Many vets complain of alienation, rage, or guilt
    • All these right wing vets get filmed saying ‘he's unfit to be commander in chief’ without providing any details.
    • ‘The movement has always had a lot of old-timers, and a lot of vets,’ said Bourgeois, a Vietnam veteran himself.
    • Even colder, whenever veterans balk at paying the usurious rip-off, company lawyers sue them, usually in courts far away from where the vets live.
    • Yep, they reversed their decision, the vets will get their surgeries, and their budget is being looked over by the National VA.
    • As part of Salute the Veterans activities, vets also attended a reception at Old Parliament House, ecumenical services and reunion dinners.
    • Before those movies happened, there were all these stories about Vietnam vets coming home and dealing with the tangential human side of the issue.
    • A large, bipartisan majority in congress supports a bill to fix this, providing full pension and disability for these deserving vets.
    • Every day WW2 vets die, and they get an inch in the local paper.
    • The vets will be interviewed via satellite from Colorado Springs where they will be attending the Air Force / Navy football game Thursday afternoon.
    • There's a second problem though, and that stems from the lack of resources in the entire VA system to take care of America's vets.
    • It will create a Labor Veterans Committee to coordinate with other veterans groups in opposing cuts to vets ' benefits.
    • Though respected by their countrymen, they get only modest help from the government, which provides up to $7 per month to disabled vets.
    • These were the best the reserve could offer - the special forces vets were gone - and Russell was already disgusted with them.
    • He explained high alleged suicide figures among vets by the fact that ‘they have to face what they did in Vietnam.’
    • The audience of silver-haired vets from wars in Vietnam, Korea, and World War II exploded into applause.
    • Out of all the homeless shelters, how many individuals are homeless vets?
    • We spent hundreds of millions (maybe billions) to educate vets after WWII and throughout the 20th Century.