There are 2 main translations of weave in Spanish

: weave1weave2

weave1

tejer, v.

Pronunciation: /wiːv//wiv/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (cloth/mat) tejer
    (basket/web) tejer
    (story/plot) tejer
    they wove a roof out of branches hicieron un techo entretejiendo ramas
    • she wove a novel around these events tejió la trama de una novela en torno a estos sucesos

    en telar

  • 2

    (thread together)
    (threads) entretejer
    (threads) entrelazar
    (branches/straw) entretejer
    the film weaves the two stories together la película entreteje las dos historias
    • she wove the twigs into a basket tejió / hizo un cesto con las ramitas
    • she weaves these anecdotes into her lectures entreteje / intercala estas anécdotas en sus conferencias

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (make cloth, baskets)
    tejer
    to get weaving poner manos a la obra
    • let's get weaving! ¡manos a la obra!
    • I'd better get weaving on that report va a ser mejor que me ponga a escribir el informe

noun

  • 1

    trama feminine
    tejido masculine
    open weave tejido abierto

There are 2 main translations of weave in Spanish

: weave1weave2

weave2

Pronunciation: /wiːv//wiv/

transitive verb

  • 1

    the river weaves a serpentine course along the valley el río serpentea por el valle
    • to weave one's way abrirse camino en zigzag
    • Villagers then filtered out the sediment by pouring the water through tightly woven cloth.
    • When woollen cloth was woven on a handloom the nap had to be combed in order to raise it.
    • From this offbeat narrative experiment, Greendale weaves a story of good, simple townsfolk under assault from authoritarian governments, corporations, media and so on.
    • The reason for this, I think, is that Mitchell simply manages to weave such a compelling story.
    • A machine for weaving cloth, programmed by a punched card, had already been perfected by the end of the 18th century by Jacquard, whose name is now a dictionary word.
    • That story is being woven by international tellers.
    • In a neatly woven narrative, he recounts the time he spent with young men for whom making it as rappers is the most likely, perhaps the only escape from an existence with virtually nil prospects.
    • In many ways, it is the pivot on which J.K. Rowling's entire tale revolves; the fabric from which the next tale will be woven.
    • In 1851, George Hemshall received the Prince Albert Medal for weaving a seamless linen shirt.
    • Both houses had hearths and ovens, and one had an upright loom for weaving cloth.
    • Cloth is woven from wild silk and from locally grown cotton.
    • The other main form of visual art is silk and cotton woven cloth with elaborate and subtle patterns and colors.
    • Wear shirts made from tightly woven cloth, like long-sleeved cotton T-shirts.
    • Craftspeople spin cotton fabrics and weave strips of cloth that are sewn together to make durable garments.
    • Two of the most prestigious silk cloths are also woven on looms fitted with a flying shuttle.
    • I was given a sewing machine so I could make my own clothes and I was given a small loom so I used to weave cloth, I was that sort of child.
    • These individuals have vivid imaginations, love to weave stories and tales, and are prone to exaggeration.
    • In her new novel, she weaves a complex tale full of unexpected plot twists and turns.
    • Every young girl was supposed to be able to weave cloth and do elaborate embroidery.
    • Where privacy is a concern, invest in lighter curtain fabrics such as lightly woven linens or cottons that have a high degree of translucence.
    • She has woven a complex narrative of hope and danger in the city that was destined to be the beacon of the New South.
    • In the cotton industry, for example, most firms either spun yarn or wove cloth, which was in turn sent to an independent dyer and finisher.
    • No one weaves their own cloth these days either, do they?
    • The story has been woven from actual incidents.
    • Women habitually baked bread, churned butter, brewed beer, sewed clothes, knitted stockings, spun yarn, and even sometimes milled flour and wove cloth.
    • It will come in handy later in the movie when we begin to wonder just exactly where the real person fits into the complex story woven around her.
    • It is a novel woven with complex images of politics, leaders, freedom fighters and their lives.
    • Call me lazy, but I don't really want to grow my own cotton, spin my own thread, weave my own cloth, and sew a shirt out of it.
    • In 1782, Watt developed a rotary engine that could turn a shaft and drive machinery to power the machines to spin and weave cotton cloth.
    • Ryan has also made a film called Against the Ropes - a fictional tale woven around the true story of female boxing promoter Jackie Kallen.
    • The tapestry is woven in wool on linen warps and contains details in silk, gold and silver.
    • Interestingly, the script has been woven from true stories of women interviewed by Naomi.
    • She weaves a fantastic visual tale of her surroundings that she constantly interacts with.
    • A roughly woven cloth was wrapped around his narrow hips and was barely long enough to keep him decent.
    • She stood frozen, gazing at the sheer beauty of the dress, each thread intricately woven to create perfection.
    • It is an inexpensive fiber from an East Asian plant and can be spun or woven into a fabric.
    • If you spin or weave you often have other interests such as looking after sheep or giving lessons.
    • Unfortunately, the only source of material for clothing is human hair, which can be woven into clothing.
    • The cloth was very strange; it was like moss and leaves that had been somehow woven together.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (road) serpentear
    (road) zigzaguear
    (person) zigzaguear
    a cyclist weaving in and out of the traffic un ciclista zigzagueando por entre el tráfico
  • 2

    (in boxing, sway)
    tambalearse
    bambolearse
    she weaved off toward the door se fue hacia la puerta haciendo eses
    • to bob / duck and weave esquivar y escabullirse