Translation of whiff in Spanish:


olorcillo, n.

Pronunciation: /wɪf//(h)wɪf/


  • 1

    olorcillo masculine
    (unpleasant) tufillo masculine
    (unpleasant) olorcillo masculine
    I caught a whiff of gas percibí un olorcillo / tufillo a gas
    • After all, who hasn't found themselves in the middle of a favourite movie only to catch a whiff of some foul miasma making its way merrily up your nostrils?
    • In an attempt to take in as much of him as I could, knowing that this wouldn't happen again, I took a big whiff of his strong cologne.
    • As I pulled the cakes out of the oven, I caught a whiff of heavenly nutmeg and knew I had a winner.
    • It was a glorious autumnal day - the sun was shining, not a cloud in the sky and only the slightest whiff of a breeze.
    • A plasma blast tore past him, close enough that he caught a whiff of burnt feathers.
    • I leaned over him and caught a whiff of his subtle cologne.
    • She said you could smell the whiff off it coming up the street.
    • She caught a whiff of alcohol on him as he passed her to throw himself on her couch.
    • She climbed in the window with ease and as she approached the stairs she caught a whiff of perfume not belonging to Mrs. Chavez.
    • He caught a whiff of her hair; it smelled like citrus.
    • Apparently the merest whiff of a grease-infused treat can harden body parts other than the arteries.
    • She bent down to pick it up and instantly caught a whiff of what was in it.
    • As we were driving down these terrible, lumpy, unlit streets we were constantly catching whiffs of different smells.
    • He could've swore he even caught a whiff of musky cologne.
    • Plus an unpleasant whiff of effluent as in the previous week's remorseless attacks on Cherie Blair, not for anything she's said or done but for the way she looks.
    • I knew I caught a whiff of something flammable in the office air Friday afternoon when a cacophony of squawking arose from a neighboring borough of Cubeville.
    • A seductive whiff of spruce, roses and wood smoke leads you to her front door.
    • Something in her gut gave a sharp tug when she caught a whiff of his cologne.
    • I caught a whiff of her hair and the flowery scent made my heart pound faster.
    • Gentle whiffs of his cologne floated up to her from the coat.
    • He heard faint movements, and caught a whiff of perfume.
    • In the absence of the traditional gale, the course is easier than any of these pros have ever seen it, soft and receptive with not a whiff of wind in the air.
    • He caught a whiff of the stench of his own feet, and tossed the boots aside.
    • The smell, however, lingered on for a while and despite the baking sunshine, at week's end there still was a whiff of unpleasantness in the air.
    • Now the musty walls are reeking only of Darren Clarke and the pungent whiff of his cheroot.
    • She took a deep whiff of his aftershave and found it quite pleasing and different from the one Jamie used.
    • The scent of humans overwhelmed his nostrils as it took a deep whiff of the air with delight.
    • When the same lobsters were reintroduced after a days' separation, they only interacted long enough to catch a whiff of each other and recall who was the more dominant.
    • What if they bring the drug dogs through and they catch a whiff of my clothes?
    • For they look set to catch a nasty whiff of sewage from an adjacent Yorkshire Water sewage treatment works - at least when the prevailing south-westerly winds are blowing.
    • I stepped into the shop, took a deep whiff of the powerful chocolate and sugar scents, and studied the pastry case.
    • We may grimace and cough when we catch a whiff, but most of the time we shrug it off as part of the cost of living in modern society.
    • A single whiff can transport us immediately to something experienced many years before.
    • Unrolling it, taking a deep whiff of that rich aroma.
    • The stink temporarily resurfaced a few months later in June 2003 and at one point was dubbed Le Pong because locals thought the whiff was being blown in from France.
    • You get warm-and-fuzzy when you catch a whiff of your grandma's perfume in Macy's.
    • Every year hundreds of new scents are marketed, but most disappear before anyone catches a whiff.
    • He took a deep whiff of the salty sea air and sighed.
    • I looked to Cory, who was seated in the front of the boat, holding his fingers to his nose and taking a deep whiff.
    • Walking up the road he caught the whiff of heaven drifting out of a small restaurant.
    • Klaxi looked pleasantly surprised and took a deep whiff of their sweet scent.
    • Sabrina took a deep whiff of the steaming beverage, eyes closed.
    • I caught a slight whiff of burnt oak in the smokeless breeze as I calmed my nerves.
    • As the train picked up speed, we caught the whiff of, well, a rest room in terrible need of cleaning.
    • Ticks that can lay dormant for decade underground and, catching a whiff of your carbon dioxide, emerge to suck you dry.
  • 2informal

    have a whiff of this milk huele esta leche

intransitive verb

  • 1Britishinformal

    oler mal
    tener mal olor Latin America
    (stronger) apestar