Translation of wick in Spanish:

wick

mecha, n.

Pronunciation /wɪk//wɪk/

noun

  • 1

    mecha feminine
    • Inside, he found a teak-and-bamboo two-level serving cart, a set of candles and wicks, and a bamboo pitcher.
    • Primitive lamps, which relied on capillary action to deliver oil or melted fat up a wick to the flame, were improved only marginally in form and material over many centuries.
    • He took his lighter from his pocket and flicked it, and touched the small steady butane flame to the wick of the candle.
    • We are running short of other items as well: wicks for candles, herbs and medicines, thread and yarn for mending, and nearly anything small, metal, and commonly-used.
    • Waving his right hand over the candle, the wick suddenly flickered, then formed into a flame, which lit his cold room.
    • Five wicks create a tall flame like a blow torch which makes a soft roaring noise.
    • He would pour wax from one candle holder to another, dousing the wick in wax and putting out the flame, effectively eliminating the usability of that candle anytime in the near future.
    • The wick of the candle is either made of a braided or twisted plant fibre (cotton or hemp) which is the safest to burn.
    • Carriages in the street used wax and wicks for their lamps.
    • One of them is preparing the candles - or, more precisely, oil lamps and wicks - that my wife lights before Shabbat arrives.
    • Not only did the increased movement of both air and oil to the wick enable the solar lamp to burn brighter, but higher priced oils like spermaceti were not required to achieve these advantageous results.
    • Shortly a fire caught in the wick of the oil lamp and shed light through the tent.
    • Picking up a small match to light a candle, Mary hesitated before setting the fresh wick to flame.
    • During this special time, all temples and some churches light lamps with wicks dipped in oil, and true religious solidarity is felt in an all-encompassing mood of cheerfulness and joy.
    • Servants hurried around, replacing candles and oil and wicks.
    • The leaves are covered with a white, downy coating that, before the introduction of cotton to Britain, was used to make candle wicks.
    • Once it is poured, it will come out only through the hole at the top of the lamp in which a wick is kept lighted.
    • In his hands he held a red candle with a wick that burned with a dancing flame.
    • From the colourful tiny candles bedecking birthday cakes to the ordinary white ones with long wicks, candles have not only served to dispel darkness, but also served as means to express love and affection.
    • The women well remember the regular job of filling lamps and trimming the wicks.