There are 2 main translations of wind in Spanish

: wind1wind2

wind1

viento, n.

Pronunciation: /wɪnd//wɪnd/

noun

  • 1

    Meteorology
    viento masculine
    (direction/strength/speed) (before noun) del viento
    a wind came up around midday alrededor del mediodía se levantó viento
    • a cold wind was blowing soplaba un viento frío
    • there is not much wind today hoy no hace / no hay mucho viento
    • a gust of wind una ráfaga de viento
    • winds light to moderate vientos suaves a moderados
    • against the wind contra el viento
    • to run before the wind ir con el viento en popa / a favor
    • we were playing into the wind estábamos jugando contra el viento
    • let's get out of the wind refugiémonos del viento
    • a wind of change was blowing soplaban vientos nuevos
    • in the wind
    • nothing's been announced, but I reckon there's something in the wind no han anunciado nada, pero a mí me parece que algo están tramando
    • a change is in the wind se viene un cambio
    • like the wind (very fast) como un bólido
    • to get the wind up asustarse
    • to get wind of sth enterarse de algo
    • to know/find out which way / how the wind is blowing saber/averiguar por dónde van los tiros
    • to put the wind up sb asustar a algn
    • to raise the wind juntar suficiente dinero
    • to sail close to the wind
    • be careful what you say, you're sailing very close to the wind cuidado con lo que dices, te estás por pasar de la raya
    • they don't act illegally, but they sail pretty close to the wind lo que hacen no es ilegal, pero casi
    • in her documentaries she tends to sail rather close to the wind sus documentales suelen ser agresivamente polémicos
    • to scatter sth to the four winds desperdigar algo
    • our group was scattered to the four winds when the war came nuestro grupo se desperdigó cuando estalló la guerra
    • to take the wind out of sb's sails desinflar a algn
    • it's an ill wind that blows nobody any good no hay mal que por bien no venga
    • wind energy/power energía eólica
    • wind pollination polinización anemógama
    • If these winds blew the same direction all the time, the dunes would line up crosswise to the breeze.
    • The south-westerly monsoon winds bring copious amounts of rain from June onwards.
    • The pollen count in the Midlands has very little dependency on the direction the winds are coming from.
    • On occasion, severe frosts, biting easterly winds and snowfall can result in winter casualties.
    • Cars were damaged by debris being blown around in the wind and torrential rain.
    • The weather might change if the winds turn easterly or southerly.
    • The wind blows in different directions within the cloud and forms a funnel.
    • Hours of rain accompanied by strong gale force winds of up to 80 mph contributed to some of the most adverse weather conditions the area has seen in decades.
    • Strong winds blowing in the direction of the arrow keep air confined in the vortex.
    • Certainly the curtains moved when the wind blew from one direction or the other.
    • Easterly winds predominate near the equator and also in the lower atmosphere at the poles.
    • It is believed that they have picked up metals blown off the bombing range by the strong easterly winds that regularly blow across the island.
    • Conditions were poor with bright sunshine and north easterly winds.
    • When the mistral winds blow it is particularly chilly, so a property with some kind of central heating is a necessity.
    • Can they move it up and down in altitude to catch winds blowing in different directions?
    • Snow slurries were expected to leave the region shivering today, with the promise of raw northerly winds, possibly gale force, blowing into tomorrow.
    • The wind howled from a south westerly direction making the weather feel quite warm for the time of the year.
    • It is subject to constant dust-laden winds variously known as sirocco, khamsin, simoom and harmattan.
    • Circular exclusion zones around contaminated farms will mean nothing if there is a strong wind blowing in one direction.
    • Strong winds blow a sandstorm through the camp when suddenly the sound of large artillery rounds is heard about 300 meters away.
  • 2

    (in bowels)
    (masculine plural) gases
    ventosidad feminine
    to have wind tener gases
    • lentils give me wind las lentejas me dan / me producen gases
    • to break wind tirarse un pedo
    • You may also experience an increase in wind at first but this will settle.
    • These foods encourage the production of wind, and may aggravate colic.
    • It is generally relieved by passing wind or actually having a bowel movement.
    • The fruit, its oils and the kernel were traditionally used to treat severe acid stomach, excess wind, fatigue after menstruation and the common cold.
    • Do you ever lose control of wind or bowel motions from your back passage between visits to the toilet?
    • A medicine called dimeticone is available to relieve trapped wind.
    • Some antacids also contain ingredients that relieve the symptoms of gas or trapped wind.
    • Other symptoms include a bloated abdomen, excess wind, nausea, vomiting and indigestion.
    • In the longer term, some people experience ongoing abdominal symptoms, such as pain, bloating, wind and diarrhoea.
    • It is reputed as a drug which dispels wind from the stomach and counteracts spasmodic disorders.
    • Some babies may need help in bringing up wind after a feed.
    • Certain foods may cause excess wind, including pulses (peas, beans, etc.), dried fruit and peanuts.
    • This may briefly cause pains similar to having wind and the urge to go to the toilet, but as the colon is empty, this will not be possible.
    • People with a predominance of phlegm are generally healthy, whereas those with predominance of bile or wind are always of indifferent health.
    • Due to weakness of bladder and stomach I experience involuntary discharge of urine and wind.
    • Eggs and fish often cause problems with bad smells, and fizzy drinks and beer produce excess wind and runny motions.
    • Her abdominal pain felt like ‘trapped wind,’ becoming progressively worse throughout the day.
    • Do not be tempted to add solid foods to your baby's bottle feed in an attempt to help them sleep at night, as this can cause wind and colic.
    • But there are other possible causes such as wind or stomach ulcers.
    • Even the slightest pressure from clothing, bedsheets or wind may elicit pain.
  • 3

    (breath)
    aliento masculine
    resuello masculine
    to lose/recover one's wind perder/recobrar el aliento
    • to get one's second wind recobrar las energías
    • I get my second wind after the 11 o'clock break recobro las energías / me siento renovado / cobro nuevas fuerzas después del descanso de las 11
    • He gave out an involuntary sigh as the wind rushed from his lungs and he dropped to his knees.
    • A hand flew across my face, and I crashed to the ground, the wind rushing out of me so hard I choked.
    • The wind was knocked out of her, and she lay gasping for breath.
    • Jackson repeated the chorus twice more before they all put down their instruments and left me with my wind knocked out.
    • She landed with a thud, and rolled, tucking her feet underneath her as the wind rushed out of her again.
    • The wind came rushing out of her, and she was left gasping for air.
    • The wind was knocked out of her for the second time in five minutes.
    • Not many singers have the wind to make it all the way to the end.
  • 4

    Music
    the wind los instrumentos de viento
    • The two concertos feature wind players from Beecham's Royal Philharmonic.
    • A jug band is essentially a string band with a wind section - harmonica, kazoos, and the jug, of course.
    • For those interested in band or wind music, this set is essential; for others this is at least very intriguing.
    • These pieces will provide a fun, challenging ensemble experience for any music class - vocal, piano, strings or winds.
    • The term is also used of a number of other large ensembles including dance orchestras, jazz orchestras, and wind orchestras.
    • However, we also are eager to add intermediate-level chamber music for any combination of strings, winds or voice without piano.
    • Written for wind orchestra and soloist, this is less a partnership of equals than of antagonists, with much brittleness in the music.
    • Aside from some frayed wind intonation, the orchestra played with rich, sonorous beauty.
    • Ensembles of three to six players of string, wind or mixed instruments are included.
    • Nothing, until the fugal entries of the main theme in the winds, really takes off.
    • However, despite a balance that favors the orchestral winds, the sound is not bad at all.
    • More often than not, while the strings and winds benefit, the piano sounds as if it were bellowing forth from far away and under water.
    • Holst had written at least two earlier chamber works featuring winds, but these represent his first mature productions.
    • There are no cellos, a disproportionately large number of double-basses, and big brass and wind sections but no oboes and bassoons.
    • The BPO are clearly enjoying themselves with some players losing strings and the winds thoroughly in harmony.
    • Charles Gounod's Petite symphonie is scored for flute and eight winds.
    • A violinist himself, he got wonderful sounds from his strings, and he made sure that the winds and brass of the Philadelphia were as good as any.
    • A platform is rigged toward the back of the stage rising over the winds and brass sections for the vocalists.
    • The movement builds to two main climaxes, introduced by two fugal passages - the first led by strings, the second by winds.
    • The string players grinned, but the wind section simply fell apart.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (exertion) dejar sin aliento
    (exertion) dejar sin resuello
    (blow) cortarle la respiración a
    he's winded está / ha quedado sin aliento / resuello
  • 2

    (baby) sacarle el aire a informal

There are 2 main translations of wind in Spanish

: wind1wind2

wind2

ovillar, v.

Pronunciation: /waʊnd//wʌɪnd//waɪnd/

transitive verb

  • 1

    • 1.1(coil)

      (wool/yarn) ovillar
      (yarn/wool) devanar
      the bandage had been wound too tightly tenía la venda muy apretada
      • to wind sth around / round sth enroscar / enrollar algo alrededor de algo
      • to wind sth on(to) sth enroscar / enrollar algo en algo
      • the snake wound itself around the branch la serpiente se enroscó alrededor de la rama
      • to wind sth into a ball hacer un ovillo con algo
      • the fisherman wound in the line el pescador fue cobrando sedal
      • to wind the film on (hacer) correr la película
      • to wind the tape back rebobinar la cinta
      • to wind the tape forward adelantar la cinta
      • Pull out a foot or two of thread and wind it immediately around one iron hook and hang the hook again into the final row of woven cloth.
      • Also on display on the cart are accessories once familiar to thousands of East Lancashire weavers - shuttles on which weft yarn was wound.
      • The cable includes armor wires wound around the corrugated-wall tube.
      • I also wound the two long power cables around the length of the printer cable and secured them with a fair number cable ties.
      • The gradual twist of the body may be likened to certain movements in nature, such as that of a vine winding around a tree.
      • There was a lot of business of selecting a kite from the stack, attaching the string, making sure the string was correctly wound on the big wooden spools.
      • The patented delay line detector features three pairs of low resistance wires wound around a hexagonal support.
      • The woven threads were wound on a device called a Niddy Noddy or more simply a yarn winder.
      • In the earliest days, the photographer had to wind 35 mm film into reusable cartridges himself, and cut the film leader.
      • Most films ran ten minutes or less, reflecting the amount of film that could be wound on a standard reel.
      • The hair was wound on small rods and the perms were very firm and curly.
      • I even wound a 10-foot length of parachute cord around my hiking staff.
      • They lived in open-air houses that wound around trees.
      • The wire can be wound around the axis of the disc to reinforce the initial field.
      • Once this is dry, fine threads of beeswax are tightly wound around it.
      • At China's Hang Zhou Silk Factory, the yarn is reeled, graded, color coded by a temporary dye, twisted, washed and wound into skeins.
      • A helical scan tape will gradually be wound around a rotating drum causing dust to be dragged in between the tape and the head.
      • Silk is spooled off large reels along the top and two, four or six strands are wound together onto spindles at the bottom, making a stronger yarn.
      • I watched my grandma pull the fur, twist it around the spool and wind it into a ball.
      • When the required number of strands are wound on, finish the thread by winding it around and down the finish post.
      • These devices are usually quite large; assembled from coils wound onto magnetic cores.
      • The ingenuity of the contraption was that a string was wound around the alarm winder and the other end tied to the bolt.
      • Pale vines wound over what looked to be emerald-green alabaster.

    • 1.2(wrap)

      envolver
      to wind sth/sb in sth envolver algo/a algn en algo
      • I tear off a long strip and wind it round Leo's wounded shoulder.
      • Then there are long strands of beads and weird exotic flowers in deep colours to wind around trees, banisters, mantelpieces and even table napkins.
      • The mammies all wore the brightly coloured cloths wound tightly round their ample figures, and turban-like round their heads.
      • Erin was quiet for a long minute, winding the blanket round her fingers.
      • The accordion player played for the children as they wound their colourful ribbons round the maypole.
      • So I put on my hat and Ems wound her scarf around her head and we went back out into the rain and east along the river until we found a pub where we stopped for a disappointing lunch.
      • The little dog was found with a cord tightly wound around its neck.
      • She saw he always wore the same pair of worn sneakers - ones with duct tape wound about them, to keep the soles in place.
      • I picked up a strand of his long brown hair, and wound it round my finger.
      • A blue mohair scarf was wound tightly round her neck, almost covering her face, and she pulled it away to speak.
      • He was bound to a stretcher with heavy duct tape, which was wound around his chest, upper arms, shoulders, ankles and the stretcher itself.
      • To hide my bare shoulders, I wound a light blue cotton cape around my neck, securing it with a bow.
      • Mr Wells had hooked a large flatfish which he thought was a skate, but it turned out to be a stingray and it wound its tail round his arm and stuck a four-inch spike into him.
      • She wound her long blue wool scarf around her throat and wheeled herself into the night.
      • Coloured tape is wound round the fingers of his left hand.
      • Laura, my guide for the day, pulls down the scarf that's wound round her face, and leans into my ear.
      • Cattle, we found, like the grass long, so that they can wind it round their tongues.

  • 2

    • 2.1(turn)

      (handle) hacer girar
      (handle) darle vueltas a
      to wind a clock/watch darle cuerda a un reloj
      • A path winds through the gardens to fairy-tale-style cottages, each with its own veranda and swing.
      • It's divided into three sections with a path winding all the way through.
      • This narrow route carved into the side of the mountains winds its way through Logan's Pass and across the Continental Divide.
      • At the end of the first day's hike, we wound our way down a dirt road to an open clearing where the evening sun shone golden on the fronts of old decaying buildings around a large grassy field.
      • I stroll up the narrow path that winds around the small hills to the school.
      • Paths made from mosaic pebbles and broken paving stones will wind through forest glades, leading the visitor to secret places and moonlit grottoes.
      • Off the beaten path on the southern tip of Jersey, this course winds through an arboretum and 50-acre bird sanctuary.
      • Time seemed to pass slowly as they wound their way from the base to Santa Barbara.
      • The path winds through a legion of eerie stone figures, some towering 100 feet above.
      • In the cradle of the Rocky Mountains, sprawled out like a giant picnic over the foothills, Calgary has the beautiful Bow River winding through its core.
      • This photo shows the flip out handle, which once wound for thirty seconds, produces full room sound for thirty minutes.
      • The path thinned out now as it wound past the private beach of a local five star hotel.
      • You make a sandwich of the printing plate and the paper and some sort of pad on top of the paper, put it in the press and wind a handle to screw down the top plate of the press.
      • Ten miles of bike paths wind through the property and link up with a more extensive regional trail network.
      • Little tarmac roads wound between the trees and little front and rear gardens were packed with small bushes that gave each property a feeling of seclusion.
      • The road to her home winds past streams of raw sewage.
      • The Lincoln Boyhood Nature Trail is a circular trail, approximately one mile in length, which winds through a natural reforested area.
      • The ground sloped down to a stream winding between alders and willows, where children play on summer evenings, enjoying the sort of idyllic childhood we would all want for our offspring.
      • The path was endless, constantly winding downward in a spiral.
      • The garden itself was just a path that wound among clusters of aspen trees along the flank of a grassy foothill.
      • If you wind the key enough, he'll go.
      • As I wound my way down a little path, with jewellery and clothing shops on either side, I spotted a tiny little shop that made me look twice.
      • They then approach along a path that winds among lush landscaping, keeping the porch's clean, strong lines always in sight.

    • 2.2(hoist, pull)

      levantar
      the nets had to be wound in by hand hubo que recoger las redes a mano
      • This is the compartment located in the fo'c's'le below and behind the anchor winch, into which the anchor chains are wound.


intransitive verb

  • 1

    (road/river) serpentear
  • 2winding pres p

    (road/river) sinuoso
    (road/river) serpenteante
    we followed them through the winding streets los seguimos por el laberinto de calles

noun

  • 1

    (turn)
    I gave my watch a wind le di cuerda a mi reloj
    • give the handle a wind dale vuelta a la manivela
  • 2

    (bend)
    curva feminine
    recodo masculine