There are 2 main translations of wit in Spanish

: wit1wit2

wit1

inteligencia, n.

Pronunciation /wɪt//wɪt/

noun

  • 1

    (intelligence) inteligencia feminine
    (ingenuity) ingenio masculine
    no one had the wit(s) to call the police nadie tuvo el tino / la inteligencia de llamar a la policía
    • come on, use your wit(s) vamos, usa la cabeza / vamos, discurre
    • to drive sb out of her/his wits sacar a algn de quicio
    • to frighten / scare sb out of her/his wits darle a algn un susto de muerte
    • to sharpen one's wits aguzar el ingenio
    • If he does play, however, he will face a keen battle of wits with England's big hitters.
    • Curley as a municipal politician had the keenest wits of any to ever face an adversary.
    • Effectively using their wits and their wit for political advocacy, they wrote, directed, acted, or did voiceovers.
    • The young smith's quick wits enabled him to recover quickly from the excitement of crossing the wall for the first time in his life.
    • If not for my quick wits, she would probably be reading me Old Mother Hubbard by now.
    • All they do have is quick wits and guys in bars who drink too much.
    • However, their quick wits and intelligence often brings them through, and they may make a fortune from nothing.
    • Success is possible but so is failure, so you are urged to keep your wits sharply honed.
    • They must count on wits and be quick on their feet in a gamble with destiny.
    • He said that person should be made captain for their bravery and quick wits.
    • The outskirts of space are wild indeed and those with the fastest draws and the quickest wits are the only ones to survive.
  • 2

    • 2.1(humor)

      ingenio masculine
      agudeza feminine
      the play was full of wit la obra era muy ingeniosa
      • she has a dry wit es muy aguda / mordaz
      • his ready wit endeared him to all con sus agudezas / sus ocurrencias / su chispa se conquistó a todo el mundo
      • He cannot tell if the flashes of wit and intelligence he witnessed in private were more revealing than the president's bumbling and ignorant moments in public.
      • He's got the quick wit and playful silliness of Neato.
      • Yet despite maintaining a slow and meditative pace throughout, The Consequences of Love is peppered with moments of understated wit.
      • Couched in honest humour and Brit wit, The Men Commandments is a list of dos, don'ts and everything in between.
      • By Wells's own testimony, she had a quick Irish wit, high spirits and radiant common sense.
      • For her part, Alpert has a keen and understated wit.
      • His sense of humour and quick wit were legendary.
      • His style was a mixture of wit, sharpness and schoolboy sarcasm, with large shots of Wodehouse and Beachcomber.
      • His acid wit and quick humour have made him a television star, but this summer Clive Anderson will return to his roots when he appears at the Edinburgh Fringe venue which helped launch his career.
      • But he makes up for it by deft wordplay and a sharp wit.
      • Thank you for your courage, intelligence, and wit.
      • Popular presenter Sue Sweeney brings her quick wit and comic humour to a new show on Saturdays starting at 9.00 am following the success of her Tuesday evening programme.
      • I realised that Satish could not understand subtle wit - though I caught him wincing at a pie-throwing scene.
      • His sense of humour and quick wit were some of his many great qualities and, indeed, were the ones that brought him through the many challenges that were presented to him on his journey.
      • Discussion is the basis of the plays, and his great wit and intelligence won audiences over to the idea that mental and moral passion could produce absorbing dramatic material.
      • However, it is hard-pressed to match the wits of Charles Hyatt and Fae Ellington.
      • We got onto the subject of smoking and she told me a joke - maybe not the funniest one in the world, but the sheer unexpectedness of it, the sharpness of the wit, made me laugh.
      • This made him an irritating companion at times, but his natural charm, his wit and his enthusiasm for the adventure in hand were very endearing.
      • But equal to this was his quick wit and indomitable humour.
      • Practically every line drips with wit and intelligence; this is a film with a lot of memorable quotes, both funny and meaningful.

    • 2.2(person)

      persona ingeniosa feminine
      persona ocurrente feminine
      ingenio masculine
      • Fairfax's readers are old and dying faster than they can be replaced, according to some wits at the company.
      • The wits who complained that it would clash with the home side's tangerine shirts had forgotten that the previous one came in the colours of Ayr.
      • But among the unacknowledged wits who may have influenced him, I think we can include Woody Allen.
      • Hanahoe is a great wit and began the banter that day when congratulating Kerry on their 5-11 to 0-9 win.
      • As a feminist wit quipped in this regard, ‘Ginger did everything Fred did except backwards and in high heels!’


There are 2 main translations of wit in Spanish

: wit1wit2

wit2

intransitive verb

  • 1

    to wit a saber
    • But what is perhaps not so obvious is how we each must eat, to wit, together, as a family of strangers making each other's acquaintance again for the first time, around a common table, in one house.
    • Now, I need you to make another assumption: to wit, that most current projects in the pharmaceutical area are projected to return very close to the minimum needed for a company to fund them.
    • I haven't time to answer him now, but I was interested in something one of his commenters said: to wit, that Social Security was put in place to replace the retirement savings of people who were wiped out in the 1929 crash.
    • The incursion of sectarian orthodoxy in Indian history involves two distinct problems, to wit, narrow sectarianism, and unreasoned orthodoxy.
    • Given that the map on the right clearly says ‘Baghdad’ in the middle, I assume you're using that staple of British wit, to wit, ‘irony.’